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Full text of "The analytical reader. A short method for learning to read and write Chinese"

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THE ANALYTICAL READER: 



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A. 



SHot^T JWetHod 



FOR 



LEARNING TO READ AND WRITE CHINESE, ^ 



BY 



M. H. p. /IDartin, H).H)., XX.ID., 

President Emerihis of the Imperial Tung-wen College. 



d Shanghai : 

Printed at the Presbyterian Mission Press. I ) 



1897. 



THE RIGHT OF REPRINTING RESERVED. 



1117 
MSC ^ 



Pt^EFRCE. 



7T new edition of this little manual has long been called for ; 
but the author has not been willing to have it re-issued 
without a thorough revision. 

In undertaking the task of preparing it for the press, he 
has been encouraged by the assurances that to those who have 
given it a trial, it has fulfilled its promise of shortening a 
weary road and lightening a heavy burden. 

Improvements have been effected in several particulars. 

1. Many errors have been corrected — quos aut incuria 
Judit, aut humana parum cavit natura. 

2. The pronunciation, originally in current Mandarin, has 
been modified, so as to bring it into conformity with the dialect 
of Peking. 

3. In the first edition no tones were marked except in the 
vocabulary. In this the Peking^tonal system is introduced into 
the text as well. 

4. The number of explanatory notes has been considerably 
increased. 

The Chinese text, I may here state, is printed in a separate 
form for the use of schools. 

As a selection of characters it has met with much favor ; 
but I regret to say that its utility as a spelling book has not 
often been put to the test. This new edition will, I trust, 
lead missionaries to renew the experiment in the schools under 
their care. 

I conclude with an extract from the Preface to the first 
edition, published in 1863 : — 



563230 

ORIENTAL 



"This book makes no pretension to superseding other 
manuals. It occupies a field of its own, and proposes to 
supply beginners with an additional help, the nature of Avhich 
is explained in the following pages. 

" In reference to one of its features I may adopt the 
words in which Professor Pauli speaks of the key to his 
Analecta Hebraica, * It contains a literal translation of all the 
words according to their order ; and the author hopes it will 
greatly assist the beginner, particularly as the finding of words 
in the lexicon is not only a tedious operation, but a very dis- 
couraging task, at the first setting out in the study of the 
language.' " 

W. A. P. M. 

Andubon Park, 

New York City, 

February 24th, 1896. 



CO^^TEflTS. 



PART I- THE METHOD. 

Sec. I. Selection of Characters. 

„ II. Analysis oj Characters. 

„ III. Remarks on the Translation. 

„ IV. Mode of Study, 

„ V. Use in schools, 

PART II— TEXT AND TRANSLATION. 

Containing characters for treating the following subjects : — 

Chap. I. Creation, Fall, Eedemption, 

Chap. II. Christ's Advent, Baptism, Temptation, Preaching, 
Doctrines, Disciples, Ordinances, Miracles, Pro- 
phecies, Last Days. 

Chap. III. Accountability, Diligence, Youth, Manhood, Schol- 
ars, Husbandmen, Artisans, Merchants, Family, 
Officers, Good Works, Retribution, Remembrance 
of Christ. 

Chap. IV. Meteorology, Geography, Time, Hills and Waters, 
Classes of Men, Architecture, Dress, Utensils, 
Precious Stones, Music, Botany, Natural His- 
tory, Memento Mori, Virtue and Vice. 

PART III—ANALYSIS. 

Characters Analyzed. 

Table of Elements. 

Exercises in Various Styles of Handwriting. 

APPENDIX. 

Table of Radicals. 
Vocabulary. 



PART L— THE METHOD. 



For euphony's sake I h.ave called it Short, though in strict- 
ness the adjective ought to have been placed in the comparative 
degree. There is no positively short road to an acquaintance 
with Chinese. But the method explained and illustrated in the 
following pages proposes, in some measure, to abridge the labor. 

This it effects in two ways — 

First, by furnishing the student with precisely those char- 
acters which he needs to know ; 

Secondly^ by laying them open to the eye and impressing 
them on the memory. 

In neither of these respects does it lay claim to entire origi- 
nality, nor is it a doubtful experiment. It treads in a safe path, 
at the entrance of which the natives have planted finger-boards, 
though they have not pursued it quite as far as we propose to 
venture. 

They discovered the magnetic needle ; it was reserved for 
others to use it in crossing the ocean. They analyze with beauti- 
ful simplicity a few scores of family names — we seize the hint and 
launch into the sea of words, confident that it shows us the way 
to the further shore. They select a thousand characters as a 
capital for beginners ; and with a view to aiding the memory 
combine them into verse. We borrow the idea, and duly acknowl- 
edging our obligation, proceed, as we believe, to improve upon it. 
Their thousand were taken at random ; we take twice the number 
and select them by a regular process, which required years of 
painstaking. They govern the distribution by no laws but those 
of metre. We too arrange them in verse ; but dispose them in 
such a manner that they are presented to the learner in a steady 
gradation, according to the frequency of their occurrence. These, 
and other leading features, require further elucidation. 

I. The Selection of Characters. 

Many years ago, while residing at Ningpo, I commenced a 
volume on a plan somewhat similar to that of the present work. 
Its progress was interrupted by a voyage to America ; but when 
I returned I was enabled to resume the task on a better basis. 
At first I had been guided in the selection of characters by no 
surer rule than thejudgmentof a Chinese scribe, who culled them 



ANAI.VIKAI, CK.M'lilC. 



from thf> pages fvf K'aiig-lii's Dictionary. \ was now favored 
witli a list;, fornied ou s<;ieiitific priiKuplc.s, in wliicli every 
character wiis placed with numerical precision according to the 
frequency of its use. 

For tliis I was indel)tod to Mr. Wra. Gamble, Superinten- 
dent of the Presbyterian j\Iission Press. 

Mr. Gamble prepared it for a purpose very different from 
mine, viz., to ascertain the proportion in which the several 
letters would be required in casting a font of metallic type 
and to determine in what order the types should be arranged, 
so as to bring those in most common use nearest to the hand 
of the compositor. Both of these ends it succeeded in effecting — 
preventing a waste of metal in casting useless type, and increas- 
ing the rapidity of "composition." It occurred to me that a 
collection arranged with such elaborate care might be adapted 
to a higher end — to save the time expended in learning rare or 
useless characters, and abbreviate for foreign students, or Chinese 
pupils, the tedious task of acquiring the written language. The 
process by which these tables were (constructed is well stated by 
Mr. Gamble in an " Introduction," the greater part of which 
I take the liberty of transcribing for the sake of the information 
it contains. 

" In order to the better understanding of the following lists 
of selected characters it is necessary to give some explanation 
of the manner in which they have been prepared and of the 
object wdiich has been kept in view in their preparation. 

" When the art of printing first sprung up in the Western 
world, printers found it necessary to compute the relative fre- 
quency with which each letter of the alphabet occurred in order 
to ascertain how many type of each sort it would be necessary 
to cast, so that there should not be too many of one letter and 
too few of another. Thus for ordinary English book work the 
proportion of each letter in a font are : of e 12,000, of t 9,000, 
of a 8,500, oi i n and s each 8,000, of r 6,200 ; whde k 
only occurs 800 times, q 500, ./ and x 400 and z but 200. 
They also in arranging them in cases, placed those that occurred 
most frequently in adjoining compartments and near the hand 
of the compositor, for the purpose of thereby promoting rapidity 
in the composition or setting up of the type. 

"But in China the use of metallic type has been of such 
modern date that little has as yet been done towards ascertaining 
the relative frequency with which characters occur in the general 
literature of this peculiar language. This remark holds good 
even with reference to its Christian literature, which is now be- 
coming pretty extensive and m which those who are engaged in 
missionary operations are more pariicuiarly interested. In conse- 



SELECTION OF CHARACTERS. 



qiience therefore of the want of correct data on which to form a 
scale, as printers call it, of the characters in the written language, 
the method hitherto in use of arrano;in(T fonts of Chinese metallic 
type, has been such that not only have the type themselves taken 
up much room, but the compositor in going from case to case for 
each type has unavoidably consumed so much time as thereby 
to render composition both expensive and tedious. 

" With the view therefore of making some improvement 
upon the former method of arrangement, as well as of ascertain- 
ing how many of the 40,919 characters contained in K'ang-hi's 
Dictionary are in common use, especially in the class of books 
used and published by those engaged in the missionary work, an 
examination was made of 4,166 octavo pages, including the whole 
Bible, together with twenty- seven other publications printed at 
our press, and embracing in the aggregate nearly one million two 
hundred thousand characters. In conducting this examination 
two Chinese scholars were employed for two years each, and it 
was carried on in such a manner as to secure as much accuracy 
as possible. The result is shown in the two following lists. 

" The FIRST LIST, which is arranged in the usual manner by 
Radicals and Strokes, contains every character which occurs in 
the above mentioned books, amounting in number only to 5,150 
different characters. The number of times each of these charac- 
ters occurred is placed opposite to it in figures which, when add- 
ed together, show an aggregate of 1,166,473 characters. It may 
here be proper to add that in the Scriptures containing the total 
number of 676,827 characters there were found 4,141 different 
ones. In the Old Testament there are in all 503,663 characters 
and 3,946 different ones; the version used being that printed at 
the London Mission Press. In the New Testament there are in 
all 173,164 characters and 2,713 different ones; the version used 
being that printed at the Presbyterian Mission Press. 

" That so few characters are of general use, as is shown by 
this statement, may seem somewhat incredible to those who have 
not examined the sul:)iect, and who, having been accustomed to 
hear the number of characters in the Chinese languasce stated to 
be forty to eight}' thousand, suppose that in order to be able to 
read or translate Chinese books a knowledge of some tens of 
thousands of characters is absolutely necessary. Our calculations 
are, however, corroborated by the author of the Chinese work 
called the "P ^ ^^ ^ ^ Shih san king tdh ts, who states that 
the f[3 ^ Fo'^?^ Boohs contain 2,328 diflerent characters; the 
i$^ P'*-^^ Classics contain 2,426 different characters which 
d.0 not occur in the Four Books, and that the whole number 
of ditferent characters in the Thirteen Classics is 6,544. This 



4 ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 

includes 928 rare or obsolete chtaracters occurring in tlie fJJ ^ 
Ready Guide, almost all of which might be omitted, thus leaving 
less than G,000 characters. 

" The SECOND LIST, like the first one, consists of all the char- 
acters different from each other that are to be found in the total 
number examined, but here it is intended to exhibit them ar- 
ranged according to their numerical use, or the relative frequency 
with which they occur. For this purpose they are divided into 
Jif teen groups, in each of whicli is contained all the characters 
occurring between a certain number of times each, as between 
1,000 and 10,000 times each, between 900 and 1,000 times 
each, between 800 and 900 times each, and so on of the others. 
The first group, however, has all those that occurred over 
10,000 times each ; and the fifteenth group includes the 850 
mentioned above as taken from another list, which ought 
properly to be placed in a group by themselves. 

"The group — the number of different characters in each 
group — their minimum and maximum numbers — together with 
the total number of times that the characters of each group 
occurred, is shown in the following table : — 



Group. 


No 


. Different Cha. 


Min. & Max. Nos. 


Totals. 


1st. 


..•.__ 


13 


. _ 


10,000 


214,156 


2nd. 


. -- — 


224 


1,000. 


10,000 


563,126 


3rd. 





16 


900- 


1,000 


15,150 


4th. 


•• >-^* 


19 


800- 


900 


16,344 


5th. 


. . — *« 


44 


700- 


800 


32,757 


6th. 





47 


600- 


700 


31,167 


7th. 





59 


500- 


600 


32,116 


8th. 





99 


400- 


500 


44,253 


9th. 


«-•»** 


112 


300- 


400 


38,024 


10th. 





197 


200- 


300 


47,932 


11th. 


«» — « » 


400 


100- 


200 


56,627 


12th. 


•• V — 


207 


75- 


100 


17,637 


13th. 


«>•>■•» 


301 


50- 


75 


18,508 


14th. 


^ «•«.» 


547 


25- 


50 


19,497 


15th. 





3,715 


1_ 


25 


19,036 



6,000 1,166,335 

*' As the result of this investisjation two most important facts 
to the printer are established. First : that five or six thousand 
ivell selected characters are sufficient Jor all i^ractical purposes ; 
which is about one-seventh of what is in the language. This 
has been long known in China, but appears to have been over- 
looked by those interested in such matters in Europe. Second : 



SELECTION OF CHARACTERS. 5 

that a very few characters, from the great frequency with 
which they occur, constitute the great body of those in a hook, 
and that the great majority occur exceedingly seldom. Thus, 
as already stated, tlie first group has 13 characters, which were 
found to occur in the whole number examined 214,156 times, 
which is more than one-sixth of the whole. Again, putting the 
two first groups together there are 237 characters, whose sum 
is 777,282, which is considerably more than one-half of the 
whole. And again, putting the first eight groups together we 
have 521 characters, whose sum is 949,074, or nearly nine- 
elevenths of the whole. On the other hand, the last or fifteenth 
group has (after deducting the 850 which should not be in 
this group) 2,865 characters, \vhicli were found to occur in the 
"whole number examiued 19,036 times, or less than one-sixtieth 
of the whole. And again, if we add the fourteenth and fifteenth 
groups together we have 3,410 characters, whose sum is 38,533, 
or only about one-thirtieth of the whole. The character ^ Che 
alone occurs 42,068 times, which is ofteuer than the sum total 
of these 3,410 characters. 

'* From a knowledge of these fiicts we have been enabled 
to arrange a large font of Chinese metallic type in so compact a 
manner that the compositor can reach any type he wants with- 
out moving more than a step in any direction ; and by having 
placed, say five hundred, of the most numerous characters toge- 
ther he has more than three-fourths of all he uses just under his 
hand, almost as conveniently as a font of Koman type are ar- 
ranged in an English printing ofiice. The result of this arrange- 
ment has been to render the work of the compositor at least three 
times as rapid and cheap as it could be done under the old ar- 
rangement of the font." 

It is certain that the proportions of Mr. Gamble's list will hold 
good, with very little alteration, for the entire range of classical 
Chinese, all the works examined in preparing them having been 
based on classic models ; but they would undergo considerable 
modification if applied to the mandarin dialects. Besides a 
change in the ratio of frequency, a dozen characters peculiar to 
the mandarin would require to be added. They not only confirm 
the observation of that early sinologue, Premare, that "a good 
knowledge of four or five thousand characters is sufiicient for all 
ordinary purposes," but furnish us with a safe guide in selecting 
that limited number. 

A word as to the form in which these characters are mar- 
shalled. Solon published his laws in verse ; and for the same 
reason a judicious mother makes rhyme the vehicle of her 
nursery lessons. We thus remember the length of the months. 



6 ANALVTirAI, lll'.ADKIl. 

long lines of kings, and many dotached facts, wliidi miglit long 
sinci! have heen given to the winds but for the jingling chain 
that binds them toi;eth(M-. Two senseless syUabli-s impriiit on 
tht; brain the colors of the. solar spectrum ; and longer but 
e(|ually senseless words ,s(;rve to fix in memory the classifications 
of Grammar iind the formulas of Lof/ic. How much more 
powerful the association when sense, sound and rythm are all 
combined ! We have then a " three-fold cord not easily 
broken." With such a bond I have souirht to connect these 
pearls, collected as it wore from the oceao sands. When secure- 
ly stored in memory they will prove of inestimable value for 
future reference. 

The credit of executing the plan is due, in no small degree, 
to my Chinese scribe, 'f^ ^jfi ^ Ho Sieii-sheng, a bachelor of 
Nanking, and whatever defects attach to mine, I am sure 
competent judges will agree that he has performed his part 
with admirable skill. 

He was placed under more embarrassing restrictions than 
those impose.'! on themselves by the monkish triflers of the mid- 
dle ages, or by our own acrostic and alliterative poets of the last 
two centuries. 

The first law of the composition, as of its native model, the 
'^ ^ %, Ts'ieii ts iven, was that each word should occur but 
once. Two or three duplicates do occur, and it will be an 
interesting exercise to search for them. 

The second, that he should confine himself to two thousand 
characters previously collected. 

The third, that this limited number was to be subdivided 
into parcels of a few hundreds each, beyond which he was not 
at liberty to expatiate. 

With all these disadvantages to contend against, in addition, 
to the restraints of verse. Ho Slen-sheng has succeeded in 
producing a poem, the first half of which is almost as lucid and 
free as it could have been, if the treasures of the Lexicon had 
been placed at his disposal. The latter part, from the nature 
of the case, is a little more obscure, but it reflects no le.s3 credit 
on the ingenuity of the composer, though there is a perceptible 
want of coherence. 

Even to these detached phrases Ho has striven to impart 
a religious tinge in keeping with the primary object of the book, 
which was to serve as a lesson book for children in schools. 
This will explain the abrupt intrusion of solemn thoughts in 
places where they are obviously out of joint. 

The author of the IVien ts iven, if tradition is to be believ- 
ed, might have adopted the language of the Prisoner of Chillon : 



ANALYSIS OF CH ARACIKKS. 7 

" My hair is grey ; but iiuL witii years, 
Nor grew it white 
In a single night 
As men's have grown from sudden fears". 

His also "grew white iu a single night", but it was in 
consequence of the exertion required in arranging in a poetical 
form a thousand arbitrary words — a task imposed on him by 
a despotic master. Ho ISien-sheug and I, who only fungor vice 
cotis, may not exhibit the same outward demonstration of our 
labors, but we have experienced enough to believe the story of 
our predecessor in the thorny path.* 

11. The Analysis of Characters. 

The object of this part is two-fold, viz., to introduce the 
foreign learner to the orthography of the language, and to supply 
the Chinese with what they have never had — a Spelling Book. 

The want of that elementary manual may excite surprise, 
but the reason is obvious. Their written lano^uaoe is not, as 
ours, essentially phonetic ; and the analysis of its sounds affords 
no clue to the composition of its characters. With us orthoepy 
and orthography are intimately connected, and mutually aid each 
other, though they are far from coinciding. In China they 
altogether part company ; one speaks wholly to the ear, the 
other addresses itself entirely to the eye. The system oi fan 
ch'ie j^ 4jT] relates to the former ; the latter, which is incom- 
parably more difficult, has to be learned without the aid of any 
system. The dictionary presents each character as a whole, 
and sometimes gives its component parts by way of conjecture 
as to its origin ; but a simple manual, which proceeds from the 
parts to the whole, presenting first the elements, and then the 
words resulting from their combination, is still a desideratum. 

There is proof too that the want has been felt, at least in 
one small class of words ; and in the same contracted corner an 
expedient has sprung up which is worthy of being employed on 
a more extended scale. Custom requires the Chinese, on meet- 
ing, to ask each other for their family names ; but many of them 
being similar in sound, as among ourselves, Lee, Lea, McLean, 
McLain, MacLane, &c., it was found difficult to understand the 
answers without some further description. Thus : 

• A native author thus relates the origin of tliafc curious work : 

According to the Tai-ping-kwang-ki, the Emperor Wu, of the Liang dynasty, hav- 
ing selected from the manuscript of the elder Wang a thousaud characters each on a 
separate slip with no duplicates, and having purposely mixed them in disorder, called for 
Cheo Hing-sze and said to him, " You are a man of talent; now turn these into verse 
for me." Cheo completed the versification in one evening and presented it to His Ma- 
jesty, but his tiair aud beard had twaed wliite. 



ANAI.VnCAL KKADKK. 



Q. What is the ii.-imc of your illustrious fjitnily ? 
Ans. The name of my igiiuhle line is CItaiuj. 
Q. IIow is it written 'i 

Ans. It is Stand up early chanp, not lonq how chanf/, 
i. c, it is the chang composed of j^ and -& '^ot t.hat composed 
of ^ and -^* it is ^^ not ^^. 

The Clangs and Changs are by this nicaHS distinguished 
into numerous clans, each wearing its own livery. 

The following surnames and others are thus familiarly 
analyzed : — 

Family Names Analyzed. 





ii 


^ 


A 


"J 


M 


^ 


^ 


^g 


'^■ 


m 


It 


-fr. 


■?• 


r^^* 

-^ 


pa 


4=- 


11^ 


A 


^ 


^ 


M 


W 


^ 


* 


i=- 


^ 


iL 


M 




m 


^ 


li 


* 


<ir 


4» 


yK 


T 


tl 


n 


^ 


-M 


jK 


M 





1t 



* i 



1=1 






m 



a 



# 



# 



\s> 


^ 


* 


+. 


!)ii{i 


^^ 


;t: 


# 


el 


* 


r^73 



^rC 



ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERS. 

A ^ ^ * 

A :^ 



PI :? 
-£ ili 

This is Spelling ; and if names are thus spelled out, in order 
to enable the hearer to write them properly, why may not other 
characters be subjected to the same treatment?* The majority 
are capable of a neat division into two or three elements, each of 
which is a distinct whole having its own sound and sense. In 
this case there can hardly be a doubt as to the advantage of 
applying the solvent. 

But there are cases in which its expediency is less clear. 
AVhere an element is neither an integer nor a radical, I have 
sometimes thought it worthy of separate attention, on account 
of its frequent occurrence in other combinations. And again 
where these imperfect elements closely resemble certain charac- 
ters ; as the parts of §^ differ but slightly from [] K'eu and 
J^ Shu, I have thought it safe to borrow the names of those 
characters for the sake of preserving the recollection of that 
resemblance, leaving the difference to be learned by observation. 
It is better to run the risk of learninor them with a triflinsf error 
than not to learn them at all. So the natives have thought, who 

* In fact many of them are analyzed by the natives. Take the following as an in- 
stance : The Chinese ministers being disinclined to make treaties with certain minor 
states some one expostulated with Chnng-how, who was at that time a member of 
the Tsung-li Yamen. He disclaimed any snch feeling, adding : " Do you know that the 
two characters g ^ (haughty) when put together make ^ (a stench)?" 

As anotlier example take this little rhyme, 

T * jBn ^ It; B fl- 



10 ANALYTICAL READKR. 

give l^^i ^^ tlie components of ^^^ p J^ as those of ^^, 

and '^'JX, '^s those of ^^. 

I iiKiy as well remark lierc, tliafc tlie wliole desij»n of this 
manual is to aid the student in getting the characters as they 
arc now written ; not to serve him as a guide to their etymolocjy. 
For that, he must penetrate deeper tlian the forms of the living 
present, exhume fossils, pursue them througli successive ages, 
and divers metamorphoses ; and then become acquainted, not 
with groups of words, as in the languages of Western Asia, but 
with individuals, an employment certairdy not the most edifying 
for a beginner. The native dictionary |^ ^ and Dr. Edkins' 
Study of the Chinese Characters may help him in that task. 
Our analysis will familiarize him with the composition of charac- 
ters ; but it will be for the vulgar end of enabling him to read 
and write, not for the gratification of philological curiosity. It 
agrees in the main, with the distinction of radicals and primi- 
tives ; but it does not proceed on it as a basis, because that 
would be fatal in the end in view, which be it remembered, is 
orthography — not etymology. This compels us to place the 
•upper element before the lower, and the left before the right, 
irrespective of the position of the radical, because this is the order 
luhich the natives observe in writing. 

To beoin with the radical, would be like spelling an 
Endish word by beginning with the root or suffix. Again, in 
dissectin(> characters with this view, it is of less moment to hit 
the joints than to divide them in such a manner that they may 
readily be recomposed. It is easier to spell cy-clops, than 
cycl-ops, though the latter shows the roots. 

The analysis is accompanied by a commentary giving the 
sense of the composition, and explaining some of the characters. 
This w^ill be highly profitable to the foreign student, though 
specially designed for Chinese readers. 

III. The Translation. 

A translation injurious to a lad, may be highly beneficial to 
a person of mature judgment. It is for such only that the present 
is made; and for so terse a composition, something of the kind 
is not merely a convenience, but a necessity. The style, like 
that of its model the ^ ^ ^, is exceedingly elliptical, and 
with all the aid of native teachers, and dictionaries, the learner 
would be liable to lose the meaning of many a sentence. This 
translation, though not superseding those indispensable aux- 
iliaries, is so constructed as, in a degree, to perform the office of 



THK MODK (»F STUDY. 11 

both. It will be specially useful to students of Chinese not in 
China. 

The mode of rendering is determined by the end proposed. 
If that were to introduce the reader to a Chinese poem, I should 
choose those expressions best suited to represent its thoughts 
and spirit. But the end is the study of words ; and this oblifyes 
me reddere verhum verbo. 

As far as the sense would admit, I have given only the 
fundamental significations, leaving the reader to infer those that 
are collateral and derivative. For instance, ^ is rendered life ; 
and this places him in possession of its other meanings, such as 
live, alive, beget, bear, he horn &c. Each character, in general, 
may thus play several parts — owing to the absence of inflection, 
appearing without any change of form, as a substantive, adjective, 
verb, or adverb, according to its position in a sentence — a feature 
of the language, which makes the knowledge of two thousand 
an important acquisition. 

Words introduced to complete the sense, excepting particles 
and pronouns, are printed in italics. 

The order of the text has been strictly adhered to, and each 
line represented by a verse in the translation ; so that the reader 
can easily ascertain what words and characters correspond — an 
arrangement which renders it equally available for a student of 
either language. 

This rule, which in any language would be fatal to the 
elegauce of a translation, is peculiarly embarrassing in Chinese ; 
and while endeavoring to make it strictly literal it has sometimes 
been necessary to violate a grammatical rule in order to give 
due relief to the idea of each particular character. 

IV. The mode of study. 

The student may learn the characters from the simple text 
by the help of the translation, marking opposite to each its 
sound as given by a Chinese teacher according to the dialect which 
he desires to cultivate. When the first chapter is completed, 
some book, say the Christian ^ -^ $]2 which is much easier 
than the native work of the same name, or one of the Gospels, 
may be taken up by way of practice. The student will 
be surprised to find himself already in possession of more 
than one half of the characters. On completing the second 
chapter, he would have more than nine tenths, and on arriving 
at the end of the fourth chapter, he will make the pleasing 
discovery that m any ordinary book the unknown characters 
ai'e few. 



12 ANAI.YI ICAI. Ki:AI)l.lf. 

The iviitliiig of iiiitivc tracts on in<«r,il sul)jccts^'' will then 
]irov(>, an aon^eablc pastimo; and tli(,' Confucian T^lassics, with 
this preparation, will he found hj.ss arduous than they are usual- 
ly regarded. 

In order to acquire a thorough mastery of these staple 
characters, it would be well for the student to proceed to Pnrt 
III, and apply himself to their orthography. For this purpose 
he should prepare a hlaidc book ruled in columns answering to 
the vertical lines of the Chinese. In this tlie sounds and sense 
of the characters, and of their elements, should be written down ; 
placing the elements first. Thus : — 



Yih 
One 



I\luh I We 

Wood I Not-yet &c. 



One or two lines might be taken at a lesson ; the sounds 
committed to memory precisely as a column in an English 
spelling book ; and the characters recomposed by combining the 
elements. It should not be regarded as learned until all the 
characters can be reproduced from the written sounds, without 
reference to the printed text. 

To aid in fixing these select characters in the mind, at once 
and forever, a kind of mnemonics will be found of service. The 
student should invent them for himself; seizing on any associa- 
tion, however absurd, which may happen to strike his fancy. 
The following may serve as specimens. 

MNEMONICS. 

The ONLY needful — an excellent heart. 
Great — one man, the Emperor. 
Heaven— the one great. 
H A DECREE — what the hiyhest said. 

J\2r Jt vL The EARTH is eartk 

ivL ^^ "til A POND is water. 

ii^ y}\ -© The SEA — water everywhere, 

70\ iK. ^ Autumn— 7/ire in the rice fields. 

* The follo^^ing are some of the most elegant and popular. 

^ -f- ^ IW CIni-tg' Family Monitor 

ik "^ ^ -ffi: ^ Kwan-ti'f! O'/as.s/c of Wakening (he World, 

35c e P^ Wi "ic Wen-chanifs Eixay on Proiiittnce. 

i!< Jl ^^ W. M T'ai-shanij'fi Tract on Bttribution. 

?R iSS ;^ fiC •'i Dissuasive from the Drowning of Daughters. 



:^ -A 



THE MODK OF STUDY. 13 

t=> ^ |_| Good — a kmih-like mouth. 
A§^ 55 ^li^ ^^^L— an inferior heart. 
r^? iHr^ Pkohibition — showing two trees and forbid- 

ZC ^L^^ Nature — the heart horn with us. 
/»3E j/v ffl J-> 8moke — the Jire of the western dirt (opium). 
vpA V S y^ A LAWSUIT— ?(;orG?6' between two dogs. 
-3Er -^ U -il The SAGE — a^?'/wce withearaudmow^A{.e. a 
areat teacher : (3E being sufficiently near to 5)* 



The Chinese see in J^ a resembhmce to ^ and describe it 
as ,i§ ^ ??ia i^e; why may not we, in 5J5 to come, see 
/j\ J\^ ~\' three men coming to a cross road ? In y^ to 
FOLLOW, why may we not find fX r J^'^^ ^^^^'^ following an 
augur, kc'i 

Associations arbitrary and ludicrous are sanctioned by 
native usage ; and the foreign student would do well not to 
despise them. 

When the two thousand characters are thoroughly master- 
ed, or one or two chapters, it will be of great advantage to 
go over them, writing under each such others as may be con- 
nected with it, by regular derivation, or casual resemblance. 
Thus : 

^ Suggests /f: tIc 7|^ Bt ^ ^ &c. 

^ '14 1(4 SSI II M^&- 

& £5tElS&c. 

% ^^5 &c. 

Iff ful?^!1H &c. 

± ihlEg &c. 

^ stfis^^if &c. 



The habit of thus grouping, on a familiar basis, all tlie 
characters the student may be able to recall, will augment the 
amount of his treasures, and confirm him in their possession. 
In this manner, the original number may easily be tripled or 



14 ANAI.YIK'AI. RKADKR 

qua(lruj)k'<l. In this work of expansion such dictionaries as 
Goodrieii or Williams may be referred to for characters, as well 
as for definitions. 

An a|)pro[)riate sequel to the study of these commou 
characters will be that of the several styles in which they 
are written, though the foreign student will do well not to 
burden himself with writing more thau one. These are six in 
number, 

1. ^C ^ '^'^'c clear square letter usually preferred in 
books, and so called from the dynasty of Sung, under which it 
came in vogue in connexion with the art of printing, at that 
time a new invention. 

2. ^1^ ^ The Pattern style — the happy mean between 
the stiff sharp angles of the foregoing, and the wavy, flowing, 
but uncertain lines of the two following The most important 
documents are always engrossed in K'ai-shu ; and large works 
are frequently printed in it. 

3. /fT" 5 Running-hand — that employed in ordinary bu- 
siness. 

4. !^ ^ The grass letter — running hand run wild, so as to 
resemble entangled grass. Though courtesy requires the scholar 
to apply the name of ts'aii ts as a depreciative epitliet to any 
specimen of his own chirography, to attain grace and ease in 
the management of this style is an object of ambition. 

5. ^^ ^ ^11 ornamental hand formerly employed in 
eucrrossino- official documents, whence the name ; though for 
that purpose it has now given place to the K'ai-shu. It is still 
much used, however, for scrolls, monumental inscriptions, and 
book-prefaces. 

6. ^^ ^ by foreigners called the Seal character on ac- 
count of its most frequent use. It is also much used for 
inscriptions on monuments and in adorning the title pages 
of books. 

The 1st., 2nd., and 5th. stand related to each other some- 
what as the Roman, Italic, and Black-letter of our letter press. 

The 3rd., 4th., and 6th., may be compared to the Round 
hand, Running band, and German text of our chirography. But 
while, in our own printing and penmanship, all the varieties 
may be made familiar to the eye, by a little attention to the 
comparison of a few forms ; to acquire a reading knowledge of 
the different styles in Chinese, is a labor of more difficulty. 
It requires the careful comparison of some hundreds of leading 
forms, and, in addition to this, the aid of constant practice. The 



IISK IN SCIIOOT.S. lo 

acquisition of the 5th. and 6th. is an accomplishment, hut au 
acquaintance with the 2ud., 3rd., and 4th. forms is of great 
utility. 

This is a task which the student will hardly feel himself at 
liberty to decline. For without it, he is liable to be confounded, 
not merely confused, by constantly meeting his old friends 
in new disguises. Not only will he be perplexed by inscriptions 
on monuments, which he meets in travelling, and the prefaces or 
title-pages of elegant works ; but the proclamation of a mandarin, 
the bill of a shop-keeper, or the letter of a native friend, will 
prove an annoying puzzle. The foreign student of German m;iy 
indulge his literary tastes, without troubling himself to decipher 
reams of handschrift ; but if resident on the banks of the Rhine 
he would find it somewhat inconvenient not to be able to learn for 
himself the contents of a familiar note. For a resident in China, 
the styles of business and correspondence are equally indispen- 
sable. 

The six styles are here mentioned in the order of their 
importance. The first is that used in the text and analysis ; 
and the reader will have the advantaofe of seeino; it in at least 
two sizes of type. 

Of the others, specimens are included in Part IJ., and for 
materials to practise on the learner need be at no loss. Monu- 
ments, sign-boards, prefaces, and letters — old ones which a 
native friend may submit to his perusal — will all come to his 

aid and further his progress. The ^t] '|§ -p -J- ^ will be 
found helpful. 

V. Use in Schools. 

With us the first stages in climbing the hill of knowledge 
are so gentle that the young scholar saunters unconscious of 
eff'ort. In China they are so precipitous, that a large proportion 
of those who attempt the ascent, fall back in despair. To grade 
the steep, facilitate the acquisition of the elements of education, 
and promote the efficiency of Christian schools was my prime 
object in preparing the Chinese portion of this work. 

Via trita via tuta is a good maxim ; but it should not 
prevent us mending the "old paths." That they have been 
trodden by the feet of millions is no evidence that they are 
incapable of improvement. Foreigners in China have not felt 
compelled to use wooden blocks in printing their books, just 
because the Chinese have done so ever since the invention of 
printing. If metallic types and revolving presses are improve- 
ments on the native mode of manufacturing books, — acknowledged 
to be so by the natives who are rapidly adopting them, -why 



16 AN'M.YTlf AT, UF ADKR. 

slioukl it be t;il<e,n as a foregone conclusion that tlie foreiorner 
can sug,L!,('St no better method for ae(juiriii<^ a knowhidge of their 
contents '': 

Is it not a fact tliat the majority of pupils in Chinese 
schools never succeed in learning to read and write? And is it 
not an equally significant fact, that the man who can read 
f^ueutl3^ and write correctly, is regarded as a scholar? The ap- 
paratus for obtaining knowh:;dge passes for learning, and rudi- 
ments are esteemed accomplishments. 

To a certain extent this is owing to the difticulty of the 
■written language, wliich is not much easier for tiie native than 
it is for the foreign student ; but it is due in part to imperfec- 
tions in the method of teaching. 

A boy of eight summers attired for the occasion in robes of 
ceremony, selecting a lucky day, enters on the career of a 
scholar by doiusf obeisance to his teacher, and kneeling before 
the picture of Confucius. A book is placed in his hands, and 
he is taught the sounds of some half a dozen characters. These 
learned, he hands the book to the teacher, and turning his back 
recites his lesson in a sing-song tone, keeping time like a pendulum 
by the vibrations of his body. Day after day he goes on cram- 
ming his memory with sounds and forms until he can patter otf 
the Four Books and thii Book of Odes as giiljy as a breviary. 
But all this time he has not obtained the glimmering of an idea. 
He has got the symbols of thought, but not the thoughts. 

This ordeal passed, he is deemed worthy of initiation into 
hi«^her mysteries. The veil is gradually withdrawn, and a ray 
of lig;ht shed on each of those dull figures, kindling them into 
life, and transforming empty sounds into the articulate voices of 
human language. 

The intellect of the lad feels the stimulus, and wakes as 
from a hibernation ; while his faculties unfold like the buds of 
Spring. Reading becomes a pleasure ; and he delights to employ 
these signs — not till now significant — for the expression of his 
own thoughts. 

But how many youth are compelled by poverty to quit 
school before the dawn of this cheering period ! How many 
more toil on for years in unalleviated darkness because they are 
too dull to complete the preliminary process to the satisfaction 
of their teachers 1 What would be thought of a school-master 
who should compel his pupils to commit the Iliad to memory 
before translating a line 7 Yet this is precisely the time- 
honored system of the Chinese ; and it is doing it no wrong to 
charge it with perpetrating the crime of mental infanticide on 
an enormous scale. 



USK IN SCHOOLS. 17 

A partial remedy applied in many mission schools is to 
require the teacher to deviate so far from the beaten track as to 
connect the sense of each character with its form and sound in 
the very commencement of his instructions. A further meliora- 
tion would be to furnish the student with a selection of charac- 
ters in common use {i.e., with the Chinese text of this Manual), 
as the readiest way to the treasures of knowledge ; and to teach 
him from the first to spell each one as an aid to memory and 
a preparation for writing. 

ITow far the first of these conditions will be met by this 
collection may be inferred from the account already given of the 
principles on which it is formed; and whether the second will be 
answered by the analytical method, may also be inferred from 
the explanation on a previous page. It only remains, therefore, 
to add an observation or two in regard to the mode of teaching. 

Who of us does not remember the young emulation which 
impelled us to learn pages of words before we had any apprecia- 
tion of their value, merely from the hope of standing at 
the head of a spelling-class ? How intense the feeling grew 
when the school was divided into parties and the combatants 
entered the lists two and two ; the victorious boy wearing his 
honors as proudly as a champion of the ring ! 

The Chinese system of education is not destitute of this 
stimulus. The more advanced students contend for academic and 
civil honors with an ardor unsurpassed in any country. But it 
is wantino- at that staofe at which an incentive is most needed. 
In the early portion of his course each pupil pursues a solitary 
path, receives instruction alone and recites alone, knowing little 
and caring less as to the progress of his fellows. In most 
primary schools the class organization is wholly unknown, and 
the teacher repeats for each individual an amount of toil which 
would suffice for a whole form. By this mode of spelling these 
inconveniences may be obviated — the spur applied to the pupil 
and labor saved to the teacher : classes may be formed and 
recitations conducted precisely as in an English school, though in 
learning their lessons pupils will require an amount of oral 
instruction which is not called for in a language whose orthog- 
raphy is more purely phonetic. 

An experiment made in a mission school while the first 
edition was passing through the press proved highly satisfactory. 
In the morning the teacher called a class before him and gave 
them the sound and sense of the characters and their elements. 
He tlieu required them to copy the lesson into a book provided 
for the purpose in order to impress it on the memory and 
accustom them to writing. In the afternoon he summoned 



18 ANALYTICAL URAnRIl. 

tlicm to recite. He pronounced a cliaraoter of the text, and the 
first pii})!! responded by giving its elements. The next character 
was analyzed by the second boy, and so on, until some one 
made a mistake ; when the character was passed on, and the 
boy who succeeded in spelling it correctly was promoted to 
the place of him who failed. 

The exercise proved novel and exciting ; and some of the 
boys who previously appeared indifferent as to progress began 
to apply themselves with diligence. Memoriter recitation, 
definition of characters, translation into the Mandarin or the 
vernacular dialect, and writing on the black-board, were ad- 
ditional exercises in which it was sought to inspire the pupils 
with the same emulation, and so render their progress pleasant 
as well as thorough. 

I conclude this introduction with a statement of Ching Sien- 
sheng, a Nanking Siu ts'ai, who was in charge of the school. 
" Since having the care of a school I have often grieved over 
the difficulty experienced by young pupils in learning the points 
and strokes of our letters. Lately, however, a work has been 
prepared, entitled Jin-ts-sin-fah, ' A New Method for Learning 
Chara(iters'. The method consists in resolving one character 
into several, and combining several into one. The most frequent 
characters in the Four Books and Five Classics are thus elu- 
cidated, so that the student not only learns them with little 
trouble, but gets at the ideas which gave birth to the characters. 
Moreover, in learning one he obtains a knowledge of three. I 
have employed this method in the instruction of my pupils, and 
found it both expeditious and thorough." " 

* The author thought of adding here a sketch of grammar, but abandoned it as 
foreign to the design of this work. In a hinguage destitute of inflection, grammar is 
obviously not the thing to begin with, though the study is both interesting and helpful 
at a more advanced stage. When that is readied the foreign student may take up 
Dr. Edkins' Mandarin ^^rammar with advantage. The native student, unless at home 
in English, has to dispense with such aid. Tlie only branch of grammar to which native 
writers pay attention is syntax ^ f^, which is studied in connexion with first efl'orts in 
composir.ion. The student's further progress belongs to ^ f^, which may properly 
be described as rhetoric. 



PART II. 

THE TEXT AI^D TRANSLATION. 

CONSTANT CHARACTERS, A COUPLE OF 
THOUSANDS. 

Note. 

Chap. I. contains 237 characters, which occur from 1000 
to 10,000 times in the books examined, and the three following 

from the next group. ^ J^ B3 

Chap. II. contains 587 characters, which occur from 200 to 
1,000 times, with the addition of the five following from the 

next groups. Wi M/^ ^ M 

Chap. III. contains 570 characters, which occur from 75 to 

200 times, and six additional from the next groups. ^§ J^ ^ 

m ,^ # . 

Chap. IV. contains the most frequent characters in the 
remaining groups, with an intermixture of useful characters 
compiled from other sources — in all 608. See page 4. 

The sum total of the four chapters is 2,016. 

The sounds originally given in the current Mandarin have 
been slightly altered to conform them to the court dialect, 

^^, which disappears at Peking, is still marked 
with a final h. The Pekinese tones are indicated by numbers, 
but it is not possible to learn them without a teacher, nor are 
they of any value at a distance from the capital. 

The vowels are those of the German, except that i and e, 
before n and ng, have the force of i in fin, and u fun ; s, ts, ch and 
sh standing alone, have a strong sibillation, as in 7'ats, church, 
pass, hush, when the sound is prolonged. 

The Greek aspirate represents a breathing, which can only 
be learned from the living voice. 



20 



ANALYTICAL KKADKR. 









•yih 



/-p" slicng 



=A^ 






i^ 



sli 



^ yiu 
p^ sliaug 



ti 



IB, clien 



^Jlg sllCDg 



ib 



pi 



uli 



2 



11^^^ 



oh 



^' 



J 



SICU 



[^ill 






r3^ 



wan 



Willi 



to 






'ki 



yi 



3 



sue 






jj^ tsiang 






RF»F. 



we 



>^4 . 






■gVh 



>^^ 



|a= 



y^i 



Tuh 



Sil 









ai]£r 



sli 



^w* 



SB 






WO 






CHAPTEK 1. 

DISCOURSES OF THE ANCIENT BEGINNINGS. 

Creatioih 

1. 

Not-yet to life icere people come, 
Before existed the Supreme Ruler, 
Only One True God, 
No holy one can compare loitli Mm. 

2. 

Six days he mightily wrought, 
First divided Heaven and Earth, 
Myriads of things multiplied (o), 
Both rare ai^b strange. 

3. 

Then also tempered clay, 
Intending to make a spiritual being (o), 
Decreed 7i^5 place in the bestowed possession, 
By thousands and hundreds all things gave. 

4. 

Again he sent one to order the family, 
Woman (o) went to serve /um, 
And calling him, said, "Husband, 
Thou and I are as one self '^ 



00 



ANALYTICAL UliADKU. 



t>i5 



f) I& 



ch'iu 
3 
clie 



1^ wu 

^^ puh 






yuh 



•p^^ shan 
4 



"m^ 



>ii^ oh 



^iU/> ting 
"^-^ sheu 



PjVo 

^^ sbih 



^/ hwoli 
g| tang 






len 



1=1 



wen 



yien 



mo 






na 



5R tsue 



pp chun< 



^huan 






d^ yang 

is ^^^ 
> 1 . 

i|j\ sm 



l>|3: 






pe 



fM 



tan 



an 






3 *Xt^4 

cbans ^*)^ ai 









till 
,^^;hah 

^\ih 

^ kiu 



shin 



seh 



A>3 



lib 



ma 



lo 



^^i- 






3. 



a 



2 -1 
tsill 



m 

Ml H 4 , 
niili : aE ^^ 



sh 



j/l^ shue 

/|-qf"iiiDg 



TRANSLATION. 23 

The Fall 

5. 

Of all the (which) desired things, 
There loas nothing not instantly granted, 
Yet wished they the good and eYil fruity 
They must-not listen to the hand's taking it 

6. 

One informed them saying " Can eat, 
Perhaps yoit ought to see" (o), 
They heard the words, felt and took. 
Getting sin tvas because-of this. 

7. 

Their middle progeny Abel (2) 
Sheep offered, with a believing heart, 
Their elder (longer) son, as elder-brother, 
Vengefully killed him; thus it is till now. 

8. 

So caused that race. 

Solely to rest in gain and name. 

To love the body and dote-on beauty (color), 

Array horses /or hattle^ and gather gold. 

9. 

The Father's mind was-not as formerlj^, 

His servant already clearly-sa?(?. 

Then from that time. 

The great waters to the four quarters went. 



24 



ANAI.YTirAL RKADRU. 



15$ 



10 



.>2 



kiiin 



UK 



sail 



*^p- ts'ii'iD 



^ wen 
^ k\\ui 



11 



^^kii 



^^^ti 



H'kwe 



MiJ 



- 

tsah 



IP 
I 

A 



t UUO- 



M' 



^^ ts'ih 






meu 



icn 



12 



13 
-^lifers 



Lent? 



<S'jL "^^^ — ^ sail 



14 



siancr 



^J,fkien ;:^6',oli 



•^'yu 



shen 

i/n'kia 



li^ 



full 






^ chuug 



d£ 



3 
\vu 



kiauof 
S^C su 



— p-" eliu 



'hwa 



^^ni 



men 



^P^.li 



jllU 



|fe^tsili 






tien 



'^ slieu 
• ^^ sliu 



^V3 



-^ sbeu 



fall 



-h^shili 



l^'^'« 



TRANSLATION. 25 

10. 

Wbiiieclj scattered, the whole world died — 
Why ask for classes and companies ! 
But those who turned to the square shelter. 
Then ivere the same-with righteous men. 

11. 

The dwellers eight ; the animals followed by 

sevens, 
Each drew them into the gate. 

Bedemptioii. 

12. 

Therefore again, God guided and taught men ; 
And greatly adding to the world's happiness, 
Sent down Jesus, (2) 
He is really the Saving Lord. 

13. 

In rank, the midst of Three, 

In relations he came-out of the Five, 

In the flower of his years, came-to the temple, 

In the assembly, he received the books. 

14. 

He joined in covenant many scholars. 
Certainly understood principles and numbers. 
Regulated rites, observed laws, 
And controlled his twelve disciples. 



26 



ANALYTICAL UKADF.U. 



15 






ch'enfr 



t2i yili 



7^ mi 

j§ tan 

111 



IG 

3E 

ffii 



wane' 



ya 



/f^ lieu 
_^ chacg 
H^ cbau 



;;^'t'ai 



1 



|iPC | kwoh 



ye 



SI 



nai 









TRANSLATION. 27 

15. 

Jerusalem and Capernaum, a city and town. 
To Babylon and Media loere ways and roads, 
Judea (2) ims a kingdom (o), 
Sinai (2) a mountain (0). 

16. 

A King, yet (and) meek and gentle, 
The after chapter illustrates these. 



Notes. 

(0) Marks the place of an expletive, which is uDtranslatable. 

(2) indicates that two characters ai^e rendered by one word. 

In names they stand for syllables, and seldom give the 

correct pronunciation, ^ secondary; f^ lord or 
uncle (verse 7). 
( ) indicates that the word enclosed is another renderiuo-, 
or an explanation. 

Verse 5. Things or persons. ^ is the .complement of the 

relative pronoun J5/j^. 
Verse 6. As a substantive -^ means ear. 

Verse 8. 7 'J means a rank ; it is also a sign of the plural 

as ylj ^ the nations. 
Verse 13. The J. f^ five social relations. 

a E, ^ T-, ^ m, 9.-^,m-k, 

Assem I )ly, tJie Synagogue, Luke IV. 16. 
Verse 14. ^[ numbers, also destinij. 
Verse 15. In names, the first or last character is frequently 

taken for the wliole. The following are the siouifiea- 

tions of those in the verse : — 

^^ cold, ^^^ J2S name of Buddha, ^ a handful, 
grip or Mow, ^ rice, ^§ like, yet, 3;^ great, huge, 
west, J^ to he. 



28 



ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 



m 



ti 



^chang 



M 



ye 



su 



riAkiau 



*^ yi"g 

4 
; mu 



r]h)L sbeh 
^JpJ kwo 



encr 



Jt^ t'au 



^ mung 



rHr. 



V siien 



iV^ 



tai 



sbuli 



■*fl-l 



sheng 



ch'eno; 



jaryiii 

r^J kau 



124 



pc 



4 
nan 



^^ hien 
^ ch'eng 
^yj kunj 
^ lau 



j^jg chue 
j^^kuih 
^fv pen 
|7j ch'u 



lZ chu e 



f^lj huin 

2 
ts^au 






mu 






soh 

I 
ch'i 



A:i' 



sbau 



^ ts 



-^1^ siau 

Tf tai 

4 



;^^ 



lien 



^ yung 






SU 



tuan 



4 



14 



smsf 



^X kiau 
4 

si 



ts eng 
^||^>ueu 
^f mung 
PV. kan 



^^^hwuh 



ch'an 



nan 



«i^ 



CHAPTER II. 

TEEATS OF JESUS STAETI^G HIS EELIG10:N'. 

Leading Topics. 

1. 

Himself formed a skin tabernacle, 
Pardoned transgression, succored refugees, 
In the chosen's (2) stead paid ransom — 
His fame and praise heconie more high. 

2. 

He fully passed-throngh bitter hardships, 
Displayed complete his meritorious toil, 
Pursuing his (its) original beginning, 
We will condescendingly instruct you (2). 

Christ's Advent 

3. 

His mother (2) Joseph's wife. 
Of few years and small, waiting mairiage, 
Was of lily face and habitually correct. 
Her fragrant nature incomparably fine. 

4. 

Having from a dream conceived. 

She suddenly gave-birth to a male heir. 



30 



ANAI,Y'l'ir;.\l, KT'ADKU. 



5 B# 6 






tun Of 



vie 






liwano" 



r3 ^ 

0^ tsLie 



1, ... 



kliin 
y\^ kwaiig ^ hu 



^I^b4 



p-h ^^^^"g I '^ 



lull 



2Kl^tsuli 
Yjj/ moll 



>tt +soli 
-f-^ sliuai 

kuen 



3^g tsau 

^ shili 

^juh 

■Hil Im 



K 



^^ 



^Iji. 



iLi<r 



>^^,sheng 
;j^ yueu 



>m^r; 



it P 



\ full 
pai 



:ino- 



JM fau 



"Y~| cliau 






::li'uli I rpfj hiang 



lau 
Icli 



\-e 
an 






liieu 

5 

sbeu 



kil 



Inve 



^Jr^kai 
l^jwu 
-fcZ/^cli'leh 



3 -**Ii,4 - 

mien PtT tsiu 



si 



bing ! ypj lio 



tsai 



no 



'hi 
't'oh 



'm y^^en 



pang 



sum 



^2. 



-Kw !^''-'s- ^Vu :^^^.h 



tS mi 

> cluing ^^ moll 
vi'iih 



n\ 



TRA^'SLATION. 31 

His Infancy. 

5. 

From the Eastern border, friendly Masters, 
The host of lights minutely beholding, 
Approach the room, humbly arrive, 
Bow-doAvn and worship according-to order. 

6. 

The king (2) was most unfeeling. 
Each door he cruelly punished, 
At night late (deep) Joseph dashed afar. 
And flying the region hid his person. 

7. 
Waitmg till the prince deceased (2), 
He led his relations and returning stopped, 
Yet afraid-of a compulsory summons, 
Escaping bore away tlie child and went. 

8. 

When a beast is old, his hide is bare. 
When a dragon appears, his head is raised, 
Escaped (avoided) (o)! how fortunate (o)i 
Originally he has no end or beginning. 

His Baptism. 

9. 

Towards the desert John cried, 
Repent, reform, take-care to he earnest. 
Christ came to baptism at the river's brink, 
Observed the rite, and did not transgress. 



32 



ANAl.YTICAr, RKADKR. 



10 



]^,p kieh 
^\>^ kwo 






we 
1>L y^iili 



^1* 

.1 






tuan 



-^1^ pien 
^^/y^ ten 



12 



11 it 

^ cbung!^. ping 



mo 



TO ch 

Btt ping 

-^ eh eng 



S^ 1 






yah 



S. ten J 



kung 
uli 



-^ Cheung 



-H yuan 



if 



pe 
2 
hi 



3 



"p- iing 



fu 



d:^4 



waiiir 



'1 
tsun 

3 

eh'ian.o; 

1 
sh 



13 
^ siu 



;fl^\eh 

pill V\l 



pau 



#R 



chih 



liang 
/Hli nu 



& fung 

:^.»v4 
pHK yii 

j j^ tsun 

1^ ch'ieu 



14 it 

[p cll'(Jlll£ 
^ o 

liwan 
" loh 



^-4 
^ tsih 



^\h 



iVd\ yu 



1^ t'iau 
5J!^ chang 



a^ 



^i ^4 

^J$ hwoh 

4> yu 



-^ tsai 



33 
shuh 



TRANSLATION. 33 

10. 

Jolm used the parable of a tree bearing fruit; 
Suiting the mouth it only gives pleasure, 
Otherwise, totally the blade will-cut it doimi^ 
Thereon to he handed-over to burniua' tierce. 



'to 



His Temptation. 

11. 

He once met the DeviPs trying, 
WJio pointing to loaves, strove to bestow them, 
And carrying him ascended a palatial house, 
To a lofty wall was he led-up. 

12. 

Also bidding him bend-down and lookabroadj 
Exalted glory he forcibly offered (gave). 

13. 

^^ To cultivate virtue planning for rewards, 
Makes honesty and rectitude both void. 
/ obey orders, and fulfill my mission, 
How dare you tempt me" ! 

His preaching. 

14. 

He rode an ass when he rejoiced (2), 
Together gathered the wise and stupid. 
The lines of command, spread-out (2), 
Saying "To rule and govern belongs to me. 



34 



ANAI.Y'I'ICAL UKADKK. 



15 



-^x 



kUDGf 



kill 



5^ we 
^Ifr niih 



%' 

m 



J^-^ch'ang 



ir, 



lion 



z^J^V) 



17 



ivva 



1110 



T^ waiig 
yuh 



chuino- 






2 
tsah 



:^>J?'sha 



tsau 



hwan 



cheu 



A 






ft^^hiah 
>1 till 
i 



ym 



Hg^aa 



pih 
cn en 



nun 



m 



pai 



^ rnaili 



sau 



/£ ting 
2 
liu 






ix 



fan 



cheug 

pien 
51 cbeu 



PH niau 



1^3,,, 



'ku 



>^ tsai 



Ig^ki 



lih 



^ 



yaug 
^fuh 



yiii 



hau 



ffl \iali 



i4' 



ku 



/j^^h-eu 



ifX' 



i\ii\ 
t 



nu 



^:J*^ts^ai 



kii 



Ml pingj 



"'toll 
ch'e 



19 

Ijj^-^.sliuh 



wans 



^'tsuh 

pa4 



^tim 



^pr bai 



3 f- 

13.; ' 



yf^ sbih 



. tsieh 

-&14 

sie 



1 



tUi^ 



en 



^Il>^ii 



TRANSLATION. 35 

15. 

I attack and smite disobedient opposers, 
Constantly collect the excellent and brave, 
Self-will reprove, passion (vapor) rebuke, 
The secret and dark, to the utmost display.'' 

16, 

He fell-into j)lots, and fled imprisonment. 
Encountered affliction in the sandy isles, 
Generally swayed the lineal descendants, 
In progressive journeys everywhere circula- 
ted. 

17. 

The flower tender easily wastes, 
Wheat in sweeping is certainly retained. 
Our race is contrary to birds and beasts, 
Which for grain to nourish do-not grieve. 

18. 

Dread loss, and calamity will-cease. 
Love war, and confusion comes-with it. 
If hatred rages, and riches are clutched, 
Soldiers seize and chariots drive them aivay. 

19. 

Who can forget Mm who is to be feared ? 
Such at-once injure body and soul. 
You ought to rest-on his protection for release, 
Dependently thank his grace and goodness. 



30 



ANAT.VTICAI, KFADKR. 



20 

J^i hi oh 



p ai 



ffl 



5 ye 



t'ien 



A 
ch 



king 



•4 



wans: 



^ liang 
^'fen 



fi^chuh 



tm kih 



JL 



^ kau 



PJ 



ko 



ti 



^\h'i 

^ yeh 

2 
suh 



ch'i 



PH tsmg 
Vfe2 
\H sue 



||Ve„ 



:?t2. 



//fn^i 



hianir 



22 



H muh 



B- yang 



I 






tsan 



me 



tl4 






muh 



X 



ch'i 



wen 



jgH'ung 

i^'^tah 



23 

:g>tu 

</Q sheng 

^ king 



nan 



^ 



r.3 



peh 



.>»4 






:&u<i 



pan 
kiu2 



me 



ig^ man 

^^^sien 



>3 



we 



it 



-rt- 



^h 



wa 



tau 



^ p'mg 



ts'iucr 



7e 

24 ^Ij 



all 






mcu 



voli 



PI 



^ kiu 



e^ 



sue 



^^ ts*un 



^^p niu 

*^^^ah 

:rl^2 

tub 



Il4 



"sih 
hien 






TRANSLATION. 37 

20. 

The doctrine distinguishes classes (2), 
Some in Eden (2), it promises to place. 
Reverence and deceit, it well divides, 
To curse forbids, in blessing is extreme. 

His Disciples. 
21. 

By the sea shore the brothers^ (2), 
Cast-aside their business, hasten to rise. 
His sandal steps beg to follow, 
"Willing to forsake their neighborhood (2). 

22. 

Their eyes recorded his compassions (2), 
"With a will they spread his pi-aise. 
Silently memorised the prayer-form. 
Opened (2) their minds to ancient history. 

23. 

Kingdom, capital, province, metropolis, 
South and North, they half traversed, 
Ever thinking on the blasphemous and false. 
Reformed, led them, calmed their passions. 

His Ordinances. 

24. 

Burning of victims (males) and cutting of 

the flesh. 
By the old usage, though retained, 
Yet lamb, cow, ox, and calf. 
As gifts, and offerings, how can they please ? 



88 



ANALYTICAI, llFAnER. 



25 



fr^ 



yu 



7^ kung 



' p u 
' t au 



jt^ ch^ing 



k'ai 






^ t aiig 



cli'eDo- 
k'iien 



^1 



^3K. 



:3 



y^i 



^ kwc 

"i«y^ 






f/:2 



keno- 
tsieh 



||*ku 

chuuo- 






^1 



yio 



- 25«^4 



PI sueu 

Si . 



3:^ mull 
sliausf 



W' 






sue 



^ ytiili 



kwe 



9" 



|^\vu 
kie 

\h hwo 

4 
inieh 



tsang 
^ liing 






meu 



fu 



1 m^^ 



28 



m 



29 

5^X23, 
uan ^^^ liau 

mien i OrB t*a 



].x^ 



dh 



shen 









yu 

tsih 



'pnl2 



3 



hwau I jr^ kwaug 



kwan 



yuen 



hwoli 



cbunj 



1 



saDff 



P-, ui 



ij^^k'tien 
^^\uli 



TRANSLATION. 39 

25. 

Instead private supplication^ public prayer. 
The grape (2), to drink and pour, 
To open the hall, and sincerely exhort, 
Adduce evidence, and proclaim the sound— 

His Miracles. 

26. 

Publishing Chrisfs words, we value parables. 

His miracles briefly in-turn succeed, 

He watched the tender plant, shepherded 

the bruised 
Evening and morning, for years and months ; 

27. 

Devils expelled, sickness healed. 
The unclean released, misery extinguished, 
The buried in the grave, from slumber rose, 
Touching his clothes, a woman was cleansed. 

28. 

He visited a boat, on the wave's face 
And stilled the wind, in the bark's bottom, 
Restored sick, around looked-on hinij 
Revived dead, standing-by rejoiced. 

29. 

For help little did he depend-on another, 
Even the judgment (2) is all his own. 
He punishes ofi'enders, widely rescues. 
And weighty authority alone sustains. 



4U 



ANALYTICAL liliADKU. 



;30 

ll'ku 






pan 



yiug 



— * •; 

13 "1^ 



eD2f 



' ^ hwai 



m 



kung 
shun 



a/N wai 



pau 



^Ui> 



leu 






sliii 

ki 

t 
chan 



B1 

/ill i'i«'' 



1: 



shoh 



lull 



^^kiu 
y^ chau 






■T' yu 

-^ tsai 



kien 



1 
yii 

g f ki 



moh 
^^ sheng ^ ch'i 



82 

|M| y"6ti 



m 



I 

sunir 



sue 



ch'i 



>l-t"J, 



:ie 






/>iii> 



;^^du 



83 f^ 34 

1x y^ 



p m 



m f" 



:£ 



tso 



^^ yiu 

l/F chin 
3C kiau 






;^^ 



yiu 
fuh 



i^tsin 
^pl cliau 



it;'- 



ch U 



^Vt^ hiang 



>^> 



:uDir 



tsiu 



i^v 



yau 



chih 



■ & 1 



yiu 
kau 



AlA^ 



tso 






mm 



bau 



TRANSLATION. 41 

80. 

Firmly guard abundance full ; 
E^^er cherish respectful obedience. 
And outward violence, inward depravity, 
You almost-certainly (2) fight victoriously. 

Prophecies. 
31. 

In scattered essays, Isaiah spoke, 
And the record long fore-tokenecl it, 
The demolished temple should again be-built, 
He fore-reckoned (2) the final period. 

Waste gardens turn to happy ground; 
On comparing (2) who (what) deceives ? 
In the streets songs, in the vallies answers, 
Must yield to mature thought. 

His Last Days. 
33. 

Artisans, officials, poor and I'ich, 
Left and right held near intercourse, 
To his casual discourses heartily submitted, 
Their class companions all summoned. 

34. 

Moved together-with the Bridegroom (2), 
Odours offered, to wine invited. 
Held oil and anointed him sitting at meat. 
When flowed his blood, they pityingly cried. 



42 



ANAI.YTKAI, READT.R. 



35 1ft 

3 .. 



^•^ yum 



^S^chen 



kioli 






po 



TJ^ «i 



la'kia 



3G 



37 



^'^liwo ^^' sing 



^S cbuli 
IgVan 



uab 
kwe 






tsai 



;h'i 



■^toh 
/^ tu 



ym 



^ cli'ih 
H pai 



-f H 2 
-^ yau 



\^' 



fall 

L 
kanof 



hi an 2 



;^ yung 
>(^ we 



m tan 

we 






38 
j^' siang 



[p] hwe 






sun 
^^ tah /^'^sli 



p:| 



shuli 



dt^kung 

liwoh 

1 . 
tsi 



tsm 



Mhh 



t=t 



^\\i 



^ 



mull 



^rl^Wiu! 



Hi 



ana 



4 , 
po 



l^-^shaug 

^ ai j 5g pien 

pal , , I /^'a^S 
^(^ k uli 



suli 






TRANSLATION. 45 

Exhortation. 

35. 

Wisdom as the rain, mercy as the clouds, 
"With thmidering horn disseminate, show forth, 
He bore the cross, and of it built an altar. 
As priests took the ark, and bore the vessels. 

36. 

Inspect the goods, estimate the silver, 
The red and white, you must give — 
We ham handled important, taken-up lead- 
ing-topics — 
He is fit to enjoy an ever-lasting throne. 

37. 

His family (2), is solitary and insignificant, 
Yet grandfather, grandson answer the record- 
Together obtain conveyance to enter. 
Where it-is-sworn is no sorrow or weeping. 

38. 

Image likenesses, why dote-on (2) ? 
Brass, iron, stone, and. wood, 
Begin to be intelligent, burst adulterous wiles, 
Uppermost consider a change of customs. 



44- ANALYTICAL KKADEK. 

NOTIiS/' 

1. =|B usually signifies a near relation, but the usage in this 

place, which is a frequent one, suggests the idea that 
one's nearest relation is himself. 
This first line contains a natural, though inelegant figure for 
the incarnation. 
3. t^ letters, referring to the marriage contract. 

8. The disclosure of Herod's real character and that of the 
fugitive. The " dragon," an emblem of the divine, refers 
to Christ. 
16. T^ usually means to perish. 

" Sandy isles" — oases. 

Though the following lines are not exact citations of Scrip- 
ture, the reader will readily recall passages in which the 
ideas occur. 
21. Lit. Elder brother and Younger brother, -^ here put for 

& signifies armor, and to ofi"end. 
25. Sound, a contraction for -jjjg ^, the Happy Sound, the 

Gospel. 
There is here an ellipsis, which is readily supplied. 
30. Guard it, lest it diminish, according to the saying, "That 

which is full invites decrease." 
32. Mature thought, lit. nine times thinking. 

35. Lit. Chest, ^ IJ, ark of the covenant. 

36. " Eed and white," Gold and Silver. 

* Hereafter pronouns will not be italicised where they are implied. In looking out 
corresponding words in text and translation they are not therefore to be counted, unless 
in capitals. 



49 



CHAPTER III. 



46 



ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 



mt# 



>^! 



tl 



sail 



^chaiig 
'sh 



jV liiiiJi 

1 
sh 



1-3 



su 



i2^ 
^£lj^ k'un.2: 






i'Ua 



;2. 



l^'kMDg 



i5^3 



stieng 



ku 



pail 
Al^ tso 



gCV sh 



;SK P'iiig 



pA sung 
ia p'eh 






kii 



sUili 



yiien 

I 
kieu 



kli 



'kioh 



0;^ 

5^ mi 



smg 



I 



3 
fu 






ti 



ku 



J^.2,. 
j^ Jiaug 

^7J ts'ai 

p'L t'oh 



^\u 



ch^ 



p-^ cliau 

■4 
kia 



hwe 



e.4 



pe 



mj 



sheu rt 






::|i4 



J^ tseh 
0T sh 

aki 



ch' 

Fp shen 
kiaD2 



cheu I J^ hia 
wau i -iRRl r 



kieu 
% ts 



j^^kui 



kiim 



t'ue 



CHAPTER HI. 

HTJMAIS" AFFAIRS. 

AccoimtaMlity. 

1. 

Opening the cave, his corpse revived, 
Spurned the empty air^ and rose aloft, 
The jewelled throne, he rested-on (2), 
Trial words, he will-speedily complete. 

2. 

Offences and faults, he judges lightly. 
Redresses wrongs difficult and huge, 
Arouses the Winded, awakes the deluded, 
And the gloomy palace withstands (2). 

Diligence^ 

3. 

Measuring talents, he commits (2), trusts; 
With protecting wings, supports, holds iis^ 
With edicts, prohibitions, persuades instructs, 
Morning and evening mirror yourself in these. 

4. 

The boy's class should-read and recite. 
Songs select, poems search. 
With front-teeth and molars, repeat, expound, 
Remote and near equally generalize. 



48 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



^ yueu 

a' 



ms 



J^V. 



rt t'ai 



[ 

ki 



2 M 

Slil 



'^ mien 






shuh 



tt 



G 
1 






ts ing 



ts ung 



^^ tsah 



^ cb leii 
^ hung 
^|_| chan 



_SL tsau 



7 



yiu 



"7" ting 



tsien 



)1± 



chuan^ 






kiau 



I 
tsuns 



1 

sliu 



j^2 

M. ^'""s 



3^3 



kwe 
p**.* cli^ien 

:£iS2 

^■^ sih 



mau 



W^ • 
•^t* siau 

y^ mm 

J^ cliung 



k luns 






w en 



kHuni 



± 
M2poh 






}V 



ki 



H>3.t 



tan 2 



m 



Igto 

^loh 



I 



ili'ki 



:||j^siiuii 



yuug 



yien 
'ch'in 
=gtuk 



l"l^"cli'uan 
>iu 



>^ ^clman 



>Ea3,vu 



1* 



fc^4 



A-A-3 



sheu 
tuh 



fti\ 



TRANSLATION. 49 

CMldliood. 
5. 

Do-but contemplate infant cliildren, 
From the womb first born and nonrishedj 
Impatient for milk, they weep for hunger. 
On matting sleep, in cotton wrapped. 

6. 

Endowed with talents pure and intelligent, 
They should altogether exclude mixed desires. 
With the primitive offence greatly tainted, 
Why-not early wash (2) U aicay? 

Youth 

7. 

Tender youth gradually strengthening, 
Acquire stains diverse-from lads. 
Deceit and modesty lurk in the countenance. 
Terror and laughter hide in the bosom. 

Bad men. 

8. 
Overbearing, boastful proud they let-loose, 
To persecute and oppress the helpless poor. 
If you abhor falling (2), into this sin^ 
The instrument and art of escape how simple ! 

Scholars. 

9. 

Some learnedly voracious of brief essays, 
On bench, or at feast, diligently read, 
Some with harp and sabre restlessly rove. 
Intent on insulting the careful and solid. 



50 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



10 



S>i2 



tsioli 



kw antr 



>1 
^ kwan 






■hu 



foil 






sai 



UDO- 



/hh ^^^^^ 

kieu 
■^^^ full 



11 



IB 



2iil 



M.;t\'u 



A^' 



94^ ren 

^"tseu 



f ^ ts'ieli 
Hi??*- 

Jfe nuug 
^ keug 



^ 



'tscli 
^:^^kwaii 



yien 
cliih 



jW^ tsien 
cli'eu 



12 



■ o 



kiau 



m ch^aog 

y ^ siicu 

>♦« tsib 



^ki 
tsih 



/p. heu 



Vy*.^ 



funj 



'cli'cu 



siaiifr 



Wy 



in 



!^| kliili 



4, 



kwe 
Ii^ien 



c 

^^ ■ 
^Y* sum 



13 I 
i=tl 



ts'au 



j^-'ch- 



ill 



yuin 



^^k^v^a 
Jti4 

3> pu 



^ kung 

M 



rain 



:!k>I 4 



liau 



ik^i 



tsinsf 



cliu 



14 



:li'eu 



jjl^llih 

kieli 



/p'clmi >^ 



cli'anir 



^ts^Lien 



7^ 

Tl^tau 






liwan 
hu 



^ 



3i- 



keu 



wu 



J^ liau 



i^' 



liiu 



^ 



"lieu 






^ 



fu 



TRANSLATION. 51 

10. 

Some are corpses in office^ barren mandarins, 
Some covet bliss and sacrifice to Buddha. 
Of their Pharisee (s) friends, 
The wheel, they should look-at, upturned. 

Husbandmen. 

11. 

In clay and mud running and walking, 
I stealthy recognize the farmer ploughman, 
At the pools irrigating, in the mists planting, 
Brushing-off the dews, and trampling the dust. 

12. 

In suburban grounds, he gathers and stores, 
The fruits of successive (2) thick abundance, 
In the jfield thinks of solemn judgment. 
Bending kneels, and piously seeks. 

Artisans. 

13. 

They wield the foot-rule^ whirl the pound-a^re. 

Are boastful of heroic steps. 

Bows, arrows, vessels, materials, 

Fine and coarse, they manufacture or cast. 

Merchants. 
14. 

They refund prices, exhaust payments, 
Coins lihe knives surround on-either-hand. 
If they should-reflect on the final end, 
With connected steps, they would run and go. 



i)Z 



ANALYTICAL llEADKK. 



m 



15^ 

m^ tsi 



16 



tsing 



mai 



mai 



fm slianj 






k'ioh 



ymg 



yen 
3 
tail 



JlL kiang 



yang 



1i 



pc 



kia 



J1IL= 



>^^ 

#^^3 



ticn 



cbancr 



^ kung 

^ shue 

' yiii 
1 
fan 



^2 ,,. 
^y^ cli len 



?i 



man 



p3 



111 



J^^i^g 



k'u 



4 
4 



^^ k'iiiDg 



ts'anof 






ts'ih 



k'an 



cli*eu< 



18 



k'ch 

Jllf-'poh 



^S^ kvven 



me 



'cli*un 



-53^4. 



liiaii 
'2 

fs^ ye 






pe 



■^^ chau 
1 
shwai 



>l^^lien 






nu 



pe 



^:^ liuni 
client 



clieh 






m ho 

4 



iiSl 



cheD2 



1^ shu 
^Ui^ cluing 



^\ 



S:^4 4t^4 , 

p^ hii I fJX p an 

-=^ YU 



keng 



'^^^ jniL tau 



k'ans 



.Art, 

1*^ 



ning 
yuin 



i\i^\ li^^'c I'^i*^-^ we 



*^ yicn 

^^ pan 
J3 f^ii^g 



TRANSLATION. 53 

15. 

At the market corner at the welPs brink, 
Buying and seUing is the stranger merchant. 
He rejects (leaves) or welcomes precipitous 

islands, 
The smooth or rough of rivers or oceans. 

16. 

Double ten-myriads, holds in his palm, 
Tributes and duties are vast and numerous, 
0/* money full, he dreads (thinks-of) theft — 
Locate your treasury in the concave azure. 

The Family. 

17. 

Worthy relatives, see acceptance. 
Brother gems, elder-sister and younger. 
Pure filial piety, a father delights-in, 
The humble and weak, protects, comforts. 

18. 
Meanness (2) begins decay, 
Be-kind and sparing to slaves and maids. 
Widely defend the root and fountain, 
Tranquility and peace will certainly com- 
fort you. 

Officers. 

19. 

They divine the virtuous, test the worthy. 
Bearing government, repay fidelity, 
They capture the rebel, restrain the robber. 
Examine the stamp, distribute the seals. 



6i 



ANALYTICAL KIvADKR. 



20 






plU 



tsu 



ijX p^ 



■^^"kieli 
55 miau 
I'^^kiiDg 






ivr 



kia 



tseu 



BE cliih 



[^j kw'au 



^f 



ii 



21 



2:1 



24 






^E:^ 



p an 



^2 
-t| kie 



1m 

FW ban 

1 . 

sinix 



m? ts leu 



I 



m' 



K4 



yien 

liu 
yoh 



;v4 



suns' 



su 



fl'^^ 



te 



Vv'Um \M\ 



m 



uli 
^^;^ tien 



ffl ^^''iJ'.g 



i4. 
^1 



_^meng , 






Jg^cU'i 



I liwai 



1^ an 



y^ 






m 1 . 



m 






kien 



hoh 



^'3 



na 



cliiiau 
yien 



cli'auj 



Iv'Ll 



IV 



^t^ 



seh 



•^61* 



*' 



JLt^S, , 

^ k'en 

4 i '-^ 1 

tcu J^ peng 



{^2,. 



P|l 



iianir 



kiien 



Tfcl^2 

'^'cb'iii 



'^'kin, 



tu 



K|\'iu 



pail 

* iJ hen 

1 
cli'en 

I 
lun 



kw'^ 



ang 



^i 



«^'ch'ien ^'lieh 



kien 



ts^an 



tseli 



TRANSLATTOX. 55 

20. 

If guests or subordinates hinder and obstruct 
"The fault seek in my unworthy person '^ 
They wait the chariot report their office, 
How too-many broad, capacious minds ? 

Good Worhs^ 
21. 
Hill and cliff, icith dawn they arrive-at, 
The Lake and Han, by star-light pass-over, 
To prolong happy-life, medicine present, 
For needy hunger, provision contribute. 

22. 

Uneven sideling ground they settle, 
Tumbling decaying banks they strengthen, 
Whence would they fight and quarrel 
Dirt and filth provoke and draw ? 

Retribution, 
23. 

The cautious, dignified, scrupulous in cove- 
nant. 
Whose praises and rewards seem dazzling. 
In the turning of an eye, fall and die. 
And dread to behold gloom and darkness. 

24. 
Guilt's net soine perversely encounter. 
The prosperous road is closed, stopped-up, 
Hugging vain regrets they sink-down (2), 
Much-more those who combine cruelty and 
theft. 



no 



wj 



25 

2 - 
tllll 



-» 



^Ihe 



liufr 



:fti 



g|SV 



t'uu 



tA^l 



PMsh 



•H^ shell 
'^ mill 
y— I slieu 
^^vaii 



liwe 






ti* 



sh 



2U 



ANALYTICAI. RF-ADEU. 



:ia 



^J2< yiieii 
we 



ku 



r4 



1^^ 



mo 



^^ 



ki 



jgyu 






nai 



s^ 



kwa 



53 . 
4 tin Of 



>fct chu 

jfVah 



11 



28 29 



uen 






cilia 



kansf 



frch 






JeS^'liuen 



M' 



ku 
>^4 

[t sliin 



fang 



i^nft3 



tau 



^^"liu2f 
J^ cheu 



lo 
5 
full 



^ 



mau 



^^fah 



piau I gj^ paiDg 



.--fang 



she 



A»m leu 



^^*i^ 7 
J^^ f' 



Vai 



P*ch 

j;:|^k^an 



chu 



W 



/fg suh 



I Jt^ shell g 



^t'o 



SI 



sians: 



'chains: 

^ shan 

■1 
sh 



^Vuh 



TRANSLATION. 57 

The Malicious. 

25. 

Corrupt cliques, venemous serpents, 
Lead companies to swallow, and devour, 
Their tongues honey, they sell sweet words^ 
Destroy capture, and rest on force. 

26. 
They vent spleen and rely on power. 
He shall sound the drum at evening season — ■ 
From the brink retire, the mountain overleap^ 
(0) Few will bear the duty in your stead. 

Detached Images. 

27. 
Board pillars, and tile towers, 
Merely exhibit the pattern decreed; 
The belt to bind, the kerchief to suspend, 
Have scattered pearls for outside ornaments, 

28. 

Rabid dogs oppress their neighbors — 
To their hard rage, gently yield, 
They let-out gall and bare their bellies, 
But a hair (2) out of place they slander and 
pierce. 

29. 

House cottage, loft or terrace, 
We only can dwell-in for a night's-lodging, 
Cattle with camels, unicorns with elephants ; 
Birds dart ; lions spring suddenly. 



68 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



30 WS^ 31 



32 



mo 



-Ai^'l 



su 



'clique g 



2. 
jan 



HP? chau 



^w> 



•It;' 

^ ting 



nfrt4 



^ 



king 

1 . 
sien 



^' 



ku 



^ y^ mang 



ts'oh 

1 

ch'a 



# 



yang 



mo 



gH chin 



:^'ko 



fung 



^^^tsien 

Jj|Vah 
Jj ta 



jH^kih 



Tf^ kwan 
mS tai 



I, pau 



J^ p^ien 

2 
hung 



y^^k^oh 



yC^ ch'uns 



^fe 



^\uh 
* poj man 
yyC cheh 



33 

H2 



yien 



jlj^fang 



kia 
kiau 



chan 

lih 



l>ipe 






P^ 



' ch^unn 
i shell 



2 . 

sum 



f&i 



^rt tseug 



yuh 
^koh 



tun 



ItC yuen 



pu 



yu 
l^'she 



we 



34 
^^nang 

chan 

^3 
pu 



kwo 
PR 4 , 

rjj cneu 
yeh 



^^ 



soh 



^^ ch*i 



kan 
Ian 



IK^ 



^[5 siii 



sum 



'S* kwan 
5^^ch'iie 



TRANSLATION. 69 

30. 

Move a millstone, and you wake insects. 
Kindle a lamp, you enlighten the blind. 
Make-haste to he ashamed of faults (2) 
Look up, long to see and be-united icitli God, 

Benienibrance of Christ 

31. 

Oft remember the nail's pain — 

Christ at-last expired at the weapon's point, 

The thorny crown, his head bore, 

His robe skirts waved red. 



Q 



2. 

They clipped a branch to scourge and strike, 
Tliirst}^, decreed him the briny c?,ep-full. 
His leg bones, thejj toere slow to break — 
Favor and age in-turn were added. 

00 

He sternly cautioned against false leaven, 
For-a-short-time declined the trembling cup, 
Sellers of doves fled the court. 
Also catchers of fish, shooters of game. 

34. 

The sack rent, flax must mend, 
The fruit-tree cursed had leaves fat. 
They sought a beast to ride to Olivet (2) 
Coming-to Zion trumpets (tubes) were-blown. 



60 



ANAI.YTIOAI- BEADRR. 



#IE 



cbm 



pah 



tsau 



yiu 



yung 
fl^ shen 
0Wiu 



pg miau 

2 
Ch^i 







^ Hi 

hbA eu 



36 
ijfl^^soh 

hia 

^'p^an 

]EQ tau 



-^ teu 

pien 

I 
cheu 



l^*ki 



I'han 






^Cd'^cliang 



we 



ch^iu 






^> 



^ 



TRANSLATION. 61 

85. 

He revives the withered, plucks the grass. 
Pardons the brave, enlarges the prisoner. 
The a&-original tribes, as well as Ch^i and Lu ; 
^H classes shall come to Mm military or civil. 

Apostles of the Faith 

86. 

North and South, by the compass they tread. 
Compare the pole-star to distinguish lands, 
Through extreme cold, and extreme heat, 
They drag the staff and girdle the globe. 



Notes. 

2, Judges, lit. doubts, according to classic precedent used here 

for J^, to decide a doubt ; to purpose. 
Redresses, lit. puts snow on, allays the burning wrongs. 
Gloomy palace, the Powers of Darkness. 
4. Generalize, lit. push, i.e., push the comparison, ^§ ^ 

6. J^ lit. matter, substance. Wash feet and head ; or from 

foot to head. 
The Chinese commentary says, " by baptism." 
10. i.e., take warning by their fate. 

13. Heroic stepsr=lofty climbing. 

14. ^^, a fountain is often used as a synonym for ^ money ; 

which anciently was knife-shaped. 
16. J^, a rule or canon ; to hold as mortgage. 

19. Repay favor with fidelity. i|^ alsomeans defeat. 

20. The language of a good officer, who makes himself responsi- 

ble. Guests, retainers. 
26. Denounce them at the eveninej of time, the end of the world. 

Reformation is a personal affair. 
28 Gall, also used for courage or audacity. 



62 Notes. 

29. It is not easy to discover the pertinence of several expres- 
sions in this part of the chapter, but let it he remem- 
bered, they were put together merely for the purpose 
of using up a residuum of characters fur which no 
place could be found elsewhere. 

32. See Isaiah 58.10 for explanation of last line. 

33. m An enclosure; hence game enclosed for a battue; :4T[^ 

to hunt. 
35. All nations, savage or civilized, shall alike submit; and all 
classes be numbered among his followers. Lii, the 
family name of Kiang T'ai-kung, Eu, Euyang-siu ; 
the one celebrated for military, the other for literary 
genius, here employed to represent two grand divisic-ns 
of society. 



«3 



CHAPTER IV. 



64 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



ti 



m 



^chang 



m 



ch*eu 
lie 



1 Fl 
^'micn 



shoh 
yj huin 



tsin 



o . 



leu 



cliih 

^ mo 

1^ ch^eu 



ch'ien 



iiii*2 



slianfr 



2 
H>2 



mu 



jrRSclric 
& k^ii 

m 



mi 
t^an 






tsvan 



k'eu 



1 

i 

4 

] 

4 
ch'ang 



fan 
fkii 



/Ji^ meu 



^'lan 



liau 



jau 



•U 






tai 



ki 



Bt'^ 



cw e 



lung 



95 ts'ien 

Wt wu 

§^4 
p^ miu 



pS chuh 

siau 



4 
^i*V sum 

liiang 



IL su 
7|;g shiianf 






^^hia 
T^ffi liwe 
/jvfC lin 



7^ ts^ai 



ch'ue 



fQ tiau 



>i^2 

>;^ yin 
^^^ ban 

i> lau 



3^ chu 

3 

tih 

5^\heh 
^B:f2 



siau j B/Rj t'iau 



CHAPTER IV. 

MISCELLAIS-EOTIS TOPICS. 

Tlie Voice of Nature. 
1. 

In connected steps trace the Creator^ s merit, 
Yery few are its defects (2), 
He cast-forth and gave esich-tJiing its class, 
Tuck-up your clothes, together worship. 

2. 

Of model forms, the mystery if you toould 

fathom, 
Perplexing sorely is their full abundance, 
Yon would almost expect the blind and deaf. 
All to repent their mistakes and errors. 

Meteorology. 

a 

The clear air encircles us^ 
We gaze attentive on the storied vault, 
The sunset's lustre has a forest of beauties, 
The rainbow splendor passes-over and melts. 

4. 

Swift thunder fiercely echoes, 

The herb, frost hastens to wither. 

In bright and cloudy, drought and flood. 

We wistfully behold Nature^s Alchemist (2). 



66 



AKALYTICAL RKADKR. 



J^'k'au 



^^2 



kiu 
hwan 



Wk'a 



ch^aog 



toan 



kw'ob 
hiah 



^\. 



m 



wa 



ch^i 



iS ch'U 






# 



PL 2 



4!f^ 



ping 

ch'eng 

chan 



jj hwah 



tans: 
fg kiaug 

■ 2 



m' 
^*\\ 



PlDg 

yien 

yai 

hiah 



^A2 



man 



moh 
'^ pau 
5|| kwoh 



1^ 

7 ^ 

'^ pi en 



'ch'en 






yia 
^Hp wu 



tseu 
^5 ch^un 



^^^ shwang 

^^t^ wan 

i 

chih 

4 

chuh 



|-tr chan 

4 . 
yien 

P^^iiau 






m 



sheh 



;^^ kwe 
i#^sh 






feu 



niiu 



^ki 



^^\eng 

ir- 



yien 



suan 






ch'u 
ch'eu 



'tai 
ch'in2 



jjPch'iian 



uau 



14 . 

tl 



ggStsoh 

tsao 



hien 
mih 



tsiu 



^^chih 
^^^sheh 



pan 

2 
tsi 



TRANSLATlOBf. 6? 

Geography* 
5. 

Search, explore, the circle of space, 
The long and short, broad and narrow, 
Bulged and sunken, rough and uneven, 
Ping's and Yien's, cliffs and passes. 

6. 

If you mistake the cross road; take a path 

for a short-cut : 
An urgent journey, a precipice interrupts, 
Extending boundaries, and opening territories, 
Barbarous and savage are embraced (2). 

Time* 

7. 
We talk a morning, and are startled by'noon, 
Passing in review spring and autumn ; 
The twin orbs gallop-on (2), 
On the dial, the departing shadow floats. 

8. 

Quietly observe evening and morning, 
Kindling flame ignites sulphur, 
Globe and transverse verify calculation. 
Rapidly, suddenly Time rushes-on (2). 

Hills and Waters. 
9. 

The Tai Mountains are lofty and eminent, 
The We stream is a distant reach, 
They chisel steeps and look for fords; 
They mount, wade, cling, and climb. 



C8 



ANALYTICAL RBADER 



10 



ts'ue 



A 



p*ai 






"prt liwan^ 



au 



i^i 



m 



ki 



J^ ch^iai 



cheD 






wan 



ki 



^ t uug 
^ keu 



2 



^I^JVih 



t auGf 



^'^\iah 



^^ liau 






lln 



tsien 






rii 



^5^ tsiang 



4 
au 






la 



ch*au 



12 
»*fman 

ban 



i^ 



linof 



#rn 



.«.''lu 



sih 



fu 



'^''liau 



m 



pan 

gaVe 



.^^4 



t'i 



miau 



JffL au 



!^ jau 



13 ^ 



.S. 



liwa 



tl 



\ . 
sie 



tiau 



laDCf 



zlX^T, 



,kbl 



i*&^ 



full 
kie 



^)b kiah 
yiu 



H. 



Jh&^ ck'ien 
liDL 



lien 



mien 



<!y^ chw'ang 

^'fuh 



a 



tseu 



14 

^^:liai 
AW 

;^L shuh 

2 
sians 



iW'^lin 



kiu 



^yien 
"^ch^in! 



^Si^ 



W 



ria 



liiu 



J.5 



tien 



me 



/tSS keu 



TRANSLATION. 69 

10. 

Summits green are ranged like sea-shells, • 
In the tide yellow sMps sail like race-horses. 
Mysterious changes ! skill extreme ! 
Noble enjoyments are therein conveyed. 

Classes of Men. 
11. 

The uncombed lad serves the aged greybeard. 
The courteous (2) the daring, the generous, 
Are selected for promotion, stimulated by 

praise : 
Flatterers, and proud, are 6?iife/or ridicule (2). 

12. 
Some are stupid (2) some sprightly (2), 
Explain (2) to the skin and hair (to a nicety). 
From the womb (2) paired and joined. 
Admirable mysteries are very abundant. 

Palaces and Houses. 

13. 
Houses have painted arbors, carved ve- 

r^mdahs. 
Double stair-ways, opposite windows, 
Elegant railings joined together, 
Gauze window-panes in clusters, (2). 

14. 
Studio, school, academy and college, 
Garner, kitchen, privy, stable — these 
Prolong fehcity, and welcome good-fortune. 
A shameful act will stain the door-post (2). 



70 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



15 



'koh 

I 

ch iu 



i|ch' 



hih 



tsan 



M 



y»ni2 



choh 
2 
hwan 



kin 



p'i 



siu 



p^e 



if^ ts'an 
Ian 



y^ hwe 
^3g hwang 



16 



in 



I 



yau 

I 
kin 



siu 



yien 






man 



'lingr 



hien 



> ^ 2 

-j^ hwang 

^^ loan 
J^ cuwang 

^Jl hwang 



17 n\ 



^-beh 



^iilC2 



W 



p'lng 



ts ai 



fp^tsie 



p3£ shwe 



3* 



mien 



t^ah 
2 

chw'ans 



^1 



yunc 
siin 

pi 
chu 



m hwe 

chu 



wan 






0^ yiiiii 
pih 
ts ai 

/|*^ ch'u 



>^^ wen 



pan 



fl 



-^ip kien 
lu 

shu 



'jnt 



^\s' 



un 



/kl 



chu 



.>»* ch 



m 



pih 



-^ ts'ing 
JU heng 
^/j* tan 



hu 



loh 
chunj 



m 



^g" ch'ing 



2 
'"ch'in 



Bj3 



j^Vang 



lu 



TRANSLATION. 71 

Clothes and Ornaments, 

15. 
LineDj fur, silk, and hemp. 
Hair-pin, pendant, bracelet, ring, 
Brocade cloak, embroidered side-piece, 
Sparkling, bright, brilliant, splendid. 

16. 

Dazzling radiant skirts and sleeves, 
Veil the image with borders and fringes; 
When even the aged's years are limited and 

brief, 
What-leisure is there to dote-on ornament (2)! 

Vessels and Utensils, 
17. 

We examine the square vessel^ and criticise 

materials, 
We borrow means to aid and assist, 
We slumber and sleep on couch and bed. 
Breakfast and sup with spoon and chopstick. 

18. 

Flourish the fly-brush, grasp the rein. 
Lick the pen, trim the paper. 
Safely store, securely provide. 
Each kind and piece record in-order. 

Precious Stones, 

19. 
Such are the inch pearl, the span gem. 
Green emerald, red coral, 
Also the Loh's bell, the Sze's barp-stone. 
Chain's tripod. Tang's censer. 



72 



ANALYTICAT, RKADEU. 






20 

m 



lino: 



laug 



43 



hu 



SX^ 



111 



21 



rs 



ma 



:«3 



nau 



Wll 



i^' 



fu 



chang 



>2 



te yuDg 



lie 



"Kg ts an 






^.hiili 






1 



siaii 






i^S-i'' 






m 



.y 1 



fun IT 



> nil -^ 



[Ml'^liwc 



^ ting 
bung 



H'yuin 

^^ k'en 

1 . 

ts'iauo- 



au 



y^ 



liu 



4t^ ling 
^^lieli 



keno; 






inn 



an 



y^ 

siu 



ts'eli 



iiif^yi-n 

f/7 fen 

mc 



24 



^*siu 



YJJ3 cliiian 

^IB cLuni: 



t. 



tai 
2 
henor 

«2 

^ yaug 

> liu 



To ^^^^ 



t\au 






noan 



fQ poll 



*l nai 



tunor 



-.6.4 






cli*en 
hcu 



uiau2C 
>^> king 



^ yiien 

1 
ban 



PI t' 



ling J 



yung 



TRANSLATION. 73 

20. 

Ling and lang, amber and ebony, 
Cornelian (2) and agate i'2.), 
Magnificent (2) and sparkling (2) — 
Treasured (2) they contain enjoyment. 

Sounds mid Music. 
21. 

Blow the bamboo flute^ beat the silken 

cliord^ 
Play the Siao and Shau, press holes^ touch 

heys — 
Pleasure's rhymes softly jingle (2), 
The Lin-ling (2) sounds like tearing silk. 

22. 

The Billow's dash, the cliff turns-back, 
Thunder booms, hghtning flashes — 
Concert singing must he harmonious (2), 
The seeming piper is ashamed-of discovery^. 

Flowers and Trees. 
23. 

As the rouged beauty or starched belle, 
Blooming, elegant, specially favored, 
Are tlie dark shadowed willow (2), 
And the green shaded wut'ung (2). 

24. 

The peach and plum contend for warmth, 
The fir and cypress endure winter. 
Profiting-by the season, ripening into beauty, 
Garden and park intoxicate with hai'mony. 



74 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



<7f^ 



pan 



y^ fang 



'4. 
KJI 1 



wA^ 



mu 



P9 



hiuh 
^Vai 



^chu 



kw e 



J^^ 



'shih 



^kie 



26 

J^ cliiicli 

yuh 



y^ fen 



Pl= 



tsii 



Al 



kioli 



mi 



kw'ai 



i^l 



4 . 
sien 



V: 

'^ shan 



27 
I'M 2 



t*eng 



[Vuh 



m4 



j^ 



jue 



fun or 



tu 



cliiiau 



^& t'ai 



lin 



au 



rhwa 



%V^ 



liu 



28 



M. 



ki 



ff 



t'un 
chah 



^ch' 



i\m <^^'^^g 



liian 

•»w hao 
•J 



au 



^1 



'hunsf 



tu 



P>^ ts loh 

i^4 1 

chau 






kill 



.^ p'^°g 



kVW 



J^'^p'au 



^ 



29 






TES 



ts'u 
cli'ioh 



kwe 
pill 



yuen 



to 






en 



ao 



'flp" kino; 



TRANSLATION. 75' 

Herbs and Vegetables. 
25. 

Full fed on fragrant aroma, 
Work your acres, store your herbs, 
Divide the melon, pluck the pot-plant, 
Boil the sun-flower, gather mustard. 

26. 
Pick and break, the confined fragrance. 
Chewing (2) increases pleasure, 
Why long for stenches and odors, 
Meats and viands, profuse, extravagant? 

Birds and Beasts. 

27. 
Mounting, 6o(?^s prosperity; brooding, good- 
luck, 
The phoenix soars. The kilin roams : 
The horse (2; runs and gallops. 
The luan and stork gyrate and hover. 

28. 

Chickens live in coops, pigs in lattice styes; 
Wild-geese on sand-banks, magpies in nests ; 
Their food (2) is spread ready — 
Who is anxious what to bake in kitchen? 

Fishes. 

29. 
The scaly-tribe (2) numerous swarms, 
The recoi'd themes are plain and reliable, 
Tortoise, terrapin, turtle, water-Kzzard, 
Leviathan (2) whale and crocodile. 



76 



ANALYTICAL llEADER. 



M 



30 



ViA ,sllC 



31 m 

L.s ail 



32 



Ati 



1 



mflnnvann' &a)'cliih 



kiiih 
::xt Ilia 



-gg ts^iob 

Jf'lau 



liian 



ITfv* 



tW'k^i^ 



^»^\'iau 



ml 



yoh 



m: 



cliu 
tsu 



yin 



m 



IW2 



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j 



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'llRj chanoj 



sue 



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yih 









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p au 






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?J bung 
2 
ins' 



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mo 



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ch'i 



*' 



sm 



33 



^^micn 
jjj?f|suh 

l^^yuug 



34 



v.-«\'i 



li'le 



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*-9. Lwau 



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5R^su 



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S''- 



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biu 
fu 



TRANSLATIOir, 77 

It plunges a locust, and you pick-up a crab, 
It swims a sparrow, you clutch an oyster. 
Tlieir eggs in moisture frequent multiply, 
For-a-moment (2) they leap and spring. 

Insects, 

31. 

The silk-worm weaves, the spider knits. 
The earth-worm sings, the locust hums, 
They loiter (2) in suites of galleries. 
Interwoven (2) in vacant halls. 

32. 

Throw-down meat, you catch ants. 
Knead boiled-rice, then buz the flies — 
Little-things ! a moment they look-about, 
But do-not think-of grief and bitterness. 

Memento 3Iori. 

Be earnest, (2) grave, dignified, 

Suddenly to meet eaiiy-death or late-death. 

This corporeal shell is-not firm. 

Faults and offences are sour and painful. 

34. 

With trickling tears and anxious dread : 
Often lead your associates (2), 
UacJi morning labor, each ten-days debate — • 
Warn them to be in awe of dissolution (2), 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



35 ^ 






ibcu 



:w c 



•}^Jj^ 



Yk^l liau 

^ taug 



Pg liiiin 
;l^ pien 



^^ cli'ih 
hi 



m' 






yiien 
muh 



2 



7t2i 



cli'iau 



t'i 



l^ kuiii 

[2 

4 yien 



3r, 






te 



f 



slian 






M ts^uh 



iba tsiii 



7^ wan 
^ ell im 






^\ih 

ell en 
2 
liau 



^ yau 

i 
shun 



ehcn 
kwe 
shen 



'iFp ehung 



Bel i^i^ 
XL k'ung 
^lit muDg 



38 



:hen 
j>J"choh 
she 
\^ cli^un 



^^ 



mi 



:5C 



shuano^ 



ohen 

■kW ■ 

T^ Piau 



ehun 



iK 2 . 

y^ yien 

^^ shau 



fu 
'1 

3 

miu 
3 
4ii^ k'en 



;i 



A 



TRANSLATION. 79 

Exhortation. 

35. 

Much-more pry-into the vast grand mystery^ 
Its noise is great without bound, 
Brilhant (2) profound, sublime, 
Upward look-to the venerable face. 

36. 

Stooping, creeping, bare-foot, kneeling, 
Ashamed, vexed, wholly purging-away evit 
Bowing down, (2) with reverence (2), 
The dark and stupid gradually reform. 

Virtue aiid Vice- 

37. 

To spur and lead the official class. 
Point-to Yu, T^ang, Yau and Shun ; 
As maxims and rules, for the belted scholar, 
Take Tslu, Mingts, Confucius, Meucius. 

38. 

Reflect-on (2) excess and purity. 
Of the twain distinguish mark and aim, 
Flaming fire will consume (2) the vicious — 
Beating the breast, earnestly entreat. 



80 analytical reader. 

Notes. 

1. Defects, gaps and leaks. Worship, knock tlic head. Pp knock. 

2. Forms designed by the Creator, each the model of a class. 

3. J^i Air of the hills, from |Jj and j^, mist or haze. 

H The evening aurora, the ahendrothe of the Germans. 

4. ^ To temper with heat, and q^ to change, transform or stir, 

taken together express the operations of the chemist. 

6. x> To copy, hence to correct in copying, also to take or 
attain by a more direct road. 

8. '(ij Transverse, a balance, but in connexion with ^ an 
astronomical instrument of whose form we arc not 
very certain. 

15. jl^ To carry at the side ; anything worn at the side. 

16. §lj Secondary or subordinate, used for the border of a 



garment. 



17. There was a vessel called 'the square.' " If the square be 

not square is it a square," said Confucius, in reference 
to some standard of judgment. 

18. 5/i* '^^ touch with the tongue, as a Chinese scribe does, to 

adjust the point of his pen. 

19. ^ ^ The Chinese title of this verse comprehends two 

classes. The antique articles named in the last two 
lines belonsf to the first class. 

^^ f Names of rivers, ^ @ Names of dynasties. 

20. In uncertainty as to some of these stones, it seems prefer- 

able to retain their native names. 

21. Slum and Linling are names of musical compositions. 

22. The sounds of nature are represented as imitated in music. 

The " seeming piper " was one who sought to pass 
for a musician, by imitating the motions of others 
in the band, but without hazarding a note. 

28. Mat. vi. 26. 

29. As kwen and cm are fabulous monsters, it will hardly be 

admitted that the ichthyology of the Chinese is 
'* plain and reliable." 

30. ^ " frequent " has the double sense of the lAVi.tm frequens. 

Locusts are believed to turn to crabs, and sparrows 
to oysters. 

31. The mu.-iical powers of the earth worm are confidently asserted. 
3.). *' Noise " in a good sense, for fame. Face, the face of God. 

37. Yu, T'ang, Yao, Shun, ancient Kings. 

38. ^ An object aimed at, ip a line to guide by. 



81 



PART. HI. 
ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERS. 

*^ >4s^ ^iH m /iv f S 
* ^ !^ Tp tJ >P 

COIS'STAI^T CHAEACTERS, A COUPLE OF 
THOrSAlTDS — Al^ALYZED. 

With a Commentary in Chinese. 



Note. 

The "elements" are of two kinds — perfect and imperfect. 
Of the former, many are found in the table of radicals, and 
others occur in the text. The rest, together with the imperfect 
elements, are arranged in a list at the end of this Part, accord- 
ing to the chapters in which they occur. 



82 






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97 



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105 



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ANALYSIS OF CHARACTEBS. 



107 



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109 






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113 



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115 



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/ha\ 



E^ 






#1 







1^ 







n 



JL 



H 






115 C tS 



?s 






w^ rfii ^ 



5 3*5 



l5l 



f Oj W 

ffl Lij la 



liHiiciii 









ANALYSTS OF CHARACTERS. 



117 






A-A^ 









It- 5^ 

^ Iff 

1^, ^ 



a di 



IrI 13 






p7) in ^ 



'^M ^iH 



^^ 






IS 
T 















f;;|^ H ^ j||g A i^ 









1=1 



0^ 



x^ \ mm^ 



It H ^ 



m 



M> ^ 'ti> 



Us 



i^tf 



x- 



r3^ 



118 






i^ n. n m 
m m t. m 

^ 7l< M 1^ 

^^ m \. . 

M IP f^ ^ 
^ l\ '" ■ 
^1t .. 
A* ^, -ai. 









W 



i: fi M. 

m m, m 


















lllpilj^ 



BJ -I. T. 5; 

111 i ^JII 









ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERS. 



119 



Ai5S 



^1 7k ^n 

ii M -Hik 

3i 5i» It' 

w r^ M 
\h w. m 

ilj 7-R .it 

*i^ >>JIi Kife 

Wi. rib© iJj 

/tKl^ Ht^ ■Hi-*/ 






^ P 



K 1 jsl 

ii 1 « 



-^ «: .• 



-H- 



A/" 












ii; ^ij 1 



^y\ 






nun ^ iS 



^/^ 



^ ):y> 



v& m fe 



1 









p 



:^fi«^^ A 

Pi 






120 



t ^ m. -T 



It 

A 
rfn 



A %. 
IS. 






ni- 
















a 

•iii» 



A 


m 
m -Hi, 






3K 



.feb J^ J;b 



3^^ /A 



r/ 



If ^W 






Mnpt 



/PTV 









.::p 



g 



@ 



A 



ANALYSIS OF CHAKACTERS. 



121 



rfcr 

m 
pa 

^' 

If 

WW 

J 
w 



m 









^ ^* 












A 

>fefe "IT 

f ^ ^ 

ft 1^ 









it ^, 



Hurt 



^ M'v' 






[1 



isi a 



?i^^^ 






>Ii> 



^tt^K 



^-Ui 



in i M 



M S 

^rf e 
J 



;2: 












t^ 






^t-S'a- 



1^1^ fl^ 



122 



t ^ ffi ^ 






A'"' 






B.\P 



-f/jiiiL 



\^ 1 ^ 

^ Jt 



l /tnt 












:IB' 



^m 



\^ J ^ 






iiifium 



if rsp 



ii^ ji 






ANALYSIS OP CHARACTERS. 



123 



^ AM ^ 

% >t^. m. m. 

;^ ^^ # M. 



p ^ 



^ 









S0 ^, ji, s 



m A ^. $ 

%h \^ t. K 






3z: 



ia 



, It li. ? J 






-ffi 






1^ 






-a 
# 



^^ 






rti 



illll£ + 



gMsat 



€11 












i 



m i 



?? -^i^ 









124 






*? 



^ 









± 



^^7b 
^ ii M 
r^ iJj M 



m 






5i H, |lJ -til, 

3C ^ ^ 

mmm. 



1^ :?tv lint 

§i 7^ ^, 















M "^^ ,Bl 









erf 
P3 



^//^ 



ANALYSIS or CHARACTERS. 



I2S 



IH- 
± 

J: 












m "H* 



pA^b^ 



^ 
M 



tit ^it^ 



*^ 



M 



^ •■ m 



1+ 
5^tf-3t 









•til. 

MM 






HUB, . , 



it 



/« 



Wi 



■tt 



1^ 












i^r^m 



it^ ;^ 



>^jk 



:fe 
a 



M 1 

i 



E, ^ -*• /,& 



_a 



if 1& 






> 5l5t 

{% HI 






ff ^ 

g^k pg 






^A 



^ 



126 



w "^ m 



^ 



JIM 









m, ^^AJl 



«*w 



-H- 






^ 






iiSl 



JV? 



f^ 



Hi M -tfcL 






m«<*f| 



;HS 






H 

» 



T^ 
^ 



fil i ^ 















^ 



*^iBr^ 



1^ 5 



ffl^ 



7C 



^ 



« 









ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERS. 



127 



M 



3C *^ 






nun 



^4 "^ 



i0 i m 






A 



t=t 



^^ 



A 






;t ^ -til. E 

-fct^ .^ O/iV tn 



IP 50 



/ \ -^^.^^ 









M m'f ii 



J: 



1 



m 



JPJ 7]C 

Tfn M'J 



n 









H 



iiL^ 



'^k 

X 



4? J: 



>•> 



^ l:g 



m 






IB. I J- 



M\ A ^1 



10 






s 
e 



P4- P4- 



>1> 



li P1^ 






128 



^ 



m ^ 



^%u 



y'.^A 



11 



^ 



m 
n 



* 









m.A 



^ 



>►> 



^ 






^ rfn 



# m 
^ -Hi, 

i^ it. 






i(P ^ 



'1 t ^ 



51^ JL 



^ M- ^ 



I 



m^n 



iUi> 



>ti> 






^#7E 



ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERS. 



129 



m ^^ 



in 1 
-0 



^^ rfn 



>l 



3>L 

Ji ^ ;i 



nun 



2IS, PtT 



t=t 



m^ 



VK ^ 






0^ m 















%\ ^^' 



in 






M -^^^ 



Pa 



It 






g 






I 5 

EEJC 
5F i 



ii ^3^ 






i^ ^ 



130 



"St 



^ 



m 



r 






>?»'/ 






A 



^ 



J] 






'1^ t t A 



ft>7> 

:^ mi 









It 



m ^ 

it M 

it ^, 

^ m 



^mi i — > 






m ^ 

it. It, 

1^. -ai, m, 



a/Li 

Pa 



i^n 






'j^"-^ m 



fi 1 ^ 



ANALYSIS OF CHARACTERS. 



131 






®» M ;^ a ^ 

^««3iw ii il R 

_^sl^^ ft, El 

1>K /|V =^ ^ -g-r^ ^^ -^Ti^ 

tK '^ A^ ^ jL W 



n 

.-iW. 



132 



TABLE OF ELEMENTS. 



From this table those characters arc excludecl, wliich are 
f()iiii<l cither in the text or among the ruxlicals. The more 
useful are marked by a cipher; but mauy of tliose contained in 
the list are obsolete, except as elements. The imperfect elements 
have no fixed sounds, but a Ohinese teacher will find no 
ditticulty in giving them names. 

CHAPTER I. 



Jl^ Ts'ung, Same as ^ from. 

o 
{III raih, To cut off the feet. 

4^ Tso, Aucient form of ^^ 

*j^ Yuen, A sroall worm. 

/C° Cha, Just now, anon. 

B^° Pih, A prince. 

© ?7, A kind of ape. 

^ Fu, Ancient form of 5.> 

Lo, To draw with the hand. 






^ Ling, Same as g 
DPP, 
^ Wu, A sorcerer. 

fM Ch'u, Same as ^^ 

Fiih, Same as fg^ 

We, Stomach. 

Chau, Seek, pay balance. 



Ko, An individual. 



t 

^ Tct/i, Virtue fi, 
Ai, Impede. 
Yih, Origiual. 



3g Shah, for mc baleful. 
If /, Tranquil. 
3^ S, A monastery. 

^ Ch'uh, Step of the left foot. 

o 

2* Tiau, Suspend, sympathize. 

^o ^» 

'jp Chen, A broom. 

1^ 

::! Ttie, Heap. 

- Al >S/«(A-, Father's younger bro- 



ther 



Jt P't/i, Equal, fellow. 

1=1 

^ i^uA, High, thick. 



Kiang, Descend, ^^ 

•^° Kivan, To pierce, string to- 
^ gether, a string of cash. 

im iuTi, Narrate. 
Pih, Shovel. 



MT'u7i, The buttocks. 
g C/iCit, Helmet. 
/\l >S/io/i, A spoon, 
"m Leu, Name of a star. 



TABLE OF ELEMENTS. 



133 



— riO 



Li, A sacrificial vessel. 



/j Tiaii, Perverse, malignant. 



tfq Ts'iu, To ferment; a chief. 



\a 



Ut Wen, Kind, compassionate. 



IMPERFECT ELEMENTS. 



ant 



ikf 



r 









o 



CHAPTER 11. 



^ Kwe, Mouth awry. 

^° Ch'eng, To succeed, to be s 
Lzi cond or lieutenant. 

Hff^ Suen, To enter. 

,ffl. Ch'eng, Altogether. 

'?pr Pe, Complete ready, ^^ 

Itf Lih, A form of ^ almanac. 

2^ Hien, Minute. 

'j^*' Yih, A leaf. 

Ill K'ioh, A pair of gems. 



^1 iu/i. Fly high. 

zfcl° 

a Yilen, Family name. 

hUP Tsang, Virtuous, prosperons. 

J:3^^ T'ai, Term of respect, form 
P of 4, 

y^ Yin, Mayor. 
M K/i, J^ Also. 



^' 



iF 



ia?^, A vail. 

T'uan, Notes on the Book of 
Changes. 

Hien, All. 
Ts'ah, Volume, set of books. 
o Tsah, Twelve months or years' 

1S> 



Tue, Exchange. 
Liu, A tassel, for 



1^' 
% 

AX' Kien, Equal. 

"t^ Yang, Sheep, goat, for ^^ 

S Choh, Firm, stable, eminent. 

Tun, Shield. 

Yilih, Fasces, emblems of 
power. 

\^ Chu, Display of music. 

. 

^ Keng, Continuous, perpetual. 



^ 



^ Ki, Successive, H^^ 

t - I o 

^ ^Vie, Ntiinc of a place. 
|H C/i', Simple, stupid. 



ANALYTICAL UKADKR. 






DC 

i 



i^i. Close, narrow, for g[>, 
jPiJi, Goveru, order. 



"H^ Yu, Yes, a girl's answer. 

-B* K'ien, A fragment. 

3f Kivai, To differ, distorted. 

MXi6, A fire vessel. 

VS. Hivan, A small bird. 

fei Ts'ung, Quick of hearing, in- 
*ll^ telligent. 

pT> ^I'A,, for ^ to attack. 



f 



A^ili, for ^ to oppose. 



^ Ch'ilen, To walk slowl3^ 
•flj* Fa^i^, Middle, invite. 

tl I"ai6, To dip water. 

riko ChHlan, Pierce through, string 
tp together. 

/1g Yin, A quarrel between dogs. 
nj Kiiing, Open windows. 

P-im, Flat. ^^ 
m[ Ch'ih, Command. 



n 



^f 



3Iau, The 4^/i hour. 
Hiiih, Cattle, for ^ 



j^ 7iu, Au eagle glance. 
il ° X». Slave. 



i/y. Liian, Disorder, for ^^ 

[M Chil, Strife, conflict. 

Jul CA'itt, A hillock. 

fll Tun, Store up, accumulate. 

V^ i/ai. The VZth hour. 

^ Yi/t, Espionage. 

ii ZrM?//, Besides, other. 

X^ P'ai, flow apart, appoint ^^ 

jig A^we, Name of a dynasty. 
Ch\ A goblin, for gi. 



pr^ Long, Gentleman, a title of 

^|) honor. 

J^ Yang, For pj, the bright or 

^ male principle. 

^^ Tsan, Praise, associate. 



Yung, A covered way. 
King, Straight, w 
Ts'an, A particle. 



ip King, Straight, waves. 



B 



Chile, ivan, Grassy. 

'' + Ts, Able, snstain, energetic. 

j^ Hilen, A kind of furnace. 

^ rvtu. Pottery. 

W Yil, A moment, 

^^ Ts'i/i, Concubice. 

nh Ku, To hire. 

^ Pi /?(/, The 3r(i of the 10 stems. 

^ Ya, For :f-. 



rai 3Iih, Consume, destroy. 
nd^ T'aiv, Beg, assail. 

j^ Chuh, A name of Szechuen. 

-i^ o 

IX. /w?, Pi/i of the 10 stems. 

^ Hwai, Bosom. 

^ Ch'iien, A document, bond. 

e/a'?^, A name. 
o 

Siang, Assist, praise. 

Kwe, A badge of office, a 

baton. 
Kiau, A stream of light, 

music. 

ft Ing, A kind of bird. 

Ft o 

-]^ Hau, Sign, cry, for ?f ^ 



TABLE OF ELEMENTS. 



135 



i 



ML 



j^i6. Tiger. 



Chuh, To build. 
IgT T'a-n-, T'an-fu, a name. 
nil Hilen, A cry, noise, for Pg^ 
PI Kang, A hill, for |^, 
B^ Cheng, To test, for §{;, 
Iff Chuh, A medicine. 
m/ Tt, Name of a place. 
•^* Ts'ang, Granary. 
-^ J.71, Understand. 
^ Y^7^, To beg. 



m 



Hwe, A comet. 



IMPERFECT ELEMENTS, 









^ 
^ 



% 



n 


f 


i 


o 


k 


o 


n 


o 



130 



ANAl.VTICAI, KKADI'.R. 



CHAPT F.R I 



Lliuj, A totul) for p^\ 



w; 



Pan, Precious for 'j^» 
Fuvg, A name. 



/i^ Yin, The female priuciple, 

-T^ Klh, The root of a tree. 
^T Ae(6, To interlock. 
hj/ Titan, A section, ball. 
/wfjT, Necklace. 



/>/> 



:^ jPi(-, Faith. 

it 

rK" i^it^, Luxuriant. 

"fe^ 7^1^, A kind of pheasant. 

|ff Ckui, To cut oflf. 

f^ Wan, Flowing tears. 

y^ Chib, Scarlet. 

We, High, perilous. 

^ il/ait, for 1^^ 

"S Ch'iau, Lofty. 



fPXi fi'ctw, To feel, or excite feeling. 

^ Fu, Diffuse, for %^ 

H& Chin, Loam, loess. 

"^ Chilan, Special, for ^^ 

g /, By, for ^, 



>^ T'u, Road, a name. 

4n* Hwe, Flowers. 

^t <Sfien, Minute, small. 

Ur Kiu, A vine. 

^1 Hung, Loud noise. 

S- Kiv'a, Vaunt, boast. 

^5 Zfie, Oppressive, courageons. 

'^ Tiu, Sentence, clause, crooked. 

^3 C/i'W', Grass. 

^r Man, Equal. 

-p Ch'a, A customs' barrier. 
IX' ' >5i^ of the 10 stems. 



I5c 

5[7 ^s, To stop. 



P'u, Abundant. 
4^ Lin, Ignis fatuus. 
^5 Ch, Single, a classifier. 
J&iT TFe, Soothe, comfort. 

Yil, Royal, drive a chariot. 



Pi, Spoiled. 
^ Kai, Beg. 

rttr 

Hien, Spinach. 



jT Kung, Arms, for ^^ 
Rjr Choh, To cut down. 



TABLE OF ELEMENTS. 



137 



j^ Sien, Ascend high. 

4cr Siau, To laugh, for ^^ 

PI Yuen, Small insect. 

y^ Luh, Lump of earth |^^ 

j^ An, Shore, ^, 
^^ ^ Hih, Hole in a wall. 

W^ Meu, Lowing of a cow. 

rt Jung, Hurried. 

lA* Jiiiiff, A weapon ; a barbarian, 

|h* Ts'ien, A bamboo tally. 

^r Fung, To butt, push. 



int 






Yien, Salt, for ^^ 

ilfa?!, Long. 

iiA., Tremble, chestnut. 

Chuh, Soft boiled rice. 

Wan, Fiuish. 

Fu, Just now. 



^^° 

a 



Z/ttTi, See, read. 



T^ T'o, Snake, used for ^, s/ig. 

VT? ;S/i, Grass used in divination. 

"^ T'eic, To spit. 

-!&• Tsaic, A flea, also for ^ early. 

Tj iV^ie?!, Twenty. 

bU Yiln, unrest. 

^ Chang, 10 ft., Chinese. 






Suih, nth hour. 
Yang, A long stream. 
Hien, A district. 



/^ CAew, Long black hair. 



Chan, Oversee, direct. 



ft:* 



f^ Pah, To drag. 

uf^ P'ang, The side. 

in Peh, 100, A centurion. 



^ Ch%Bes. 



IMPERFECT ELEMENTS. 



n 



.9 



I 
^ 

M 
^ 



JUL 



138 



ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 



CHAPTER IV. 



ral Mien, Face. 

"^^ H'ilin, To smoke, to cnre 
^^ moat. 

4^ Kuih, Different, certain. 

MK ^^'^^'^0^ Dignity, name of a 
5t>*P kingdom. 

iP 

JbL^ Wu, A name. 

jbr Liau, Bright, clear. 

H ^Siau, Like, good. 

V4 

i^ Ch'ue, Lofty. 

-T^ Chio, A vestibule. 

1^ rix-i, Shore. 

ctr Ch^eoig, Hand up. 

C/i, A sort of earth. 

Ts'ung, Haste, for -^^ 
o 
Ch'in, Respect, imperial. 

ij^ *S^, A horned tiger, 

^ C/m/i, Chisel, for ^, 

1>:t i^cm, A fence, lattice. 

^' K'ait, Investigate. 

IS Hie, A one horned goat. 

^iT Au, Ramble, for j^^ 

(Mf Sih, Separate, explain. 

yK P-e, Great. 

"^jg Kivan, Weave. 

H il/e, Eyebrow. 



^ 



5p Ts'an, A meal. 

a^ y^e1^, Detain, conceal. 

^ T'aA., Buoyant. 



ta 



gl* Eiang, Boundary, for |^^ 

^^ ZtiA, Wood carving. 

H Fuew, Round, dollar, officer. 

K> Kien, Firm. 

n£ Ting, Palace. 

1^ Kenig, 1th of the stems. 

Tl Ch^eu, 2nd hour. 

A> A'tve, 10th of the stems. 

on Li, Beautiful, for jg^ 

>rj/ Chileh, Join. 

pg ZJTiA, Neck erect. 

J& P'm, Rapid, utterance. 

(tt^ ^oA, Crane. 

^B Kau, Call, high, a name. 

S! At, Diffuse, for ft, 

S Heng, Good luck. 

op yu, A family name. 



/J^ 



^ OA, Fright. 



^ Kiiih, Handful, for ^^^ 

^ Lih, Hairy. 

it Mang, Beard of grain. 



TABLE OF ELEMENTS. 



139 



^0 

72. 



K'lih Shell, for ^, 
Kwe, A rnle. 
Ts'ih, Satire; blame. 
Ts'an, A hare. 



Yuen, Abj'ss, for f^^ 
/M Yum, Equal, for J^^ 
■^ F-ieu, Virtuons, excellent. 



1 



IMPERFECT ELEMENTS. 



n F 



o 



140 



1? 



STYLES OF WRITING. 

Chapter I. In Five Forms.* 

Pattern, Business, Grass, Old Official, Seal, 



^J'> *- 



^^ y \ 



e ^ ij 13 g 












#^^^* 

%^^^^ 





7»>^ 



T^^v 






•^^M-^ ll^f^v^i't:^ 



♦The Sungt'i, or book style which completes the ;?; §, or six forms of writing, 
may b© seen in the text. 



STYLES OF WRITING, 



141 






i^ 












Kli^'/i^ ## 



TSS? 




■S-^^ 






'"^-^nmn 



mm 

y p g a ^ 










^fi 



^ ^ i ^ H 






142 



ANALYTICAL READER. 















x^ 






HI "^ 4[ -^ -^ 






4> i? ^^<^ 



STYLES OF WRITING. 



143 






\ji i^ ef i^ ^ 



-^ itiL. 1^ .^^ ,^i^ 



U y^ 1^ ^'] /'] 






144 



ANALYTICAL READER. 









^ 






# 




^ 




:?:■ Jt. ^. J: Ji 



11 m % If # 









-0^ 






STYLES OF WRITING. 



145 










filT^ 






146 



ANALYTICAL READRR. 



1^ m ^ ib ^^ 



m^ '^ (^ fA 



p ^^ -fitt ^.P ^ 






^^ m? 



f^^f fir 






fl ?) t) ^ ^ 



If^^^i^-^ %*^^t 






STYLES OF WRITING. 



147 






%m 







^ 












m\ K 



^?^^^ aLi 



U) VX4 04 )X> jji 



w ^ m ^ $ 



VOCABULARY 



OF 



TWO THOUSAND FREQUENT CHARACTERS, 



Arranged according to Radicals. 



WITH 



THEIR MOST COMMON SIGNIFICATIONS, 



AND 



THE SOUNDS OF THE PEKING DIALECT. 



NOTE. 



Tlio student while studying the first two chapters should 
raake himself familiar with the radicals as a preparation for 
using this vocabulary, or native dictionaries. On completing 
the four chapters he would find it profitable to read the 
vocabulary from beginning to end, even though he may have 
consulted it from time to time. 

For tlie sake of brevity those significations which are most 
easily deducible, have been omitted ; and the student is expected 
to bear in mind that feature of the language which admits of 
the same ivorcls being employed without alteration in diff*erent 
parts of speech Thus after giving ^ as life it would be 
superfluous to define it further as to live, alive, &c. 

The mode of transliteration answers in the main to that 
in general use. The chief departure from it is in the non-use 
of hs. The two classes of words, which in current Mandarin 
begin with h and 5, are in Peking combined, or rather confused 
so as to be utterly uudistinguishable. In this vocabulary it has 
been thought best to preserve the distinction. The student can 
hardly go wrong, if he always sees h alongside of s and vice 
versd. The combination is foreign to English, and like the 
tones, must be learned by ear. 

The tone marks are here attached to the transliteration — 
not to the characters as in the text — the first and second being 
placed at the lower left; the third at the upper left, and the 
fourth at the upper right. They are all indicated by ]), except 
the second, which is distinguished by ^. In case of discrepancy 
of tone between text and vocabulary the one represents the tone 
as read ; the other as spoken. Where two pronunciations are 
given for one character they usually indicate a diflerence of 
meauinsr. The student who has not access to a Pekinsf teacher 
will do well to confine himself to one sound, unencumbered 
by tones. 



THE 214 RADICALS 



WITH THELE 



SOUNDS AND SEGNIFICATIONS. 



1 Stroke. 

Yih. 
— * One. 

IKwen. 
Piiss through. 



J 



Chu. 
A point. 

P'ih. 

A left stroke. 

Yih. 

One, cursred. 

Kiiih. 
Hooked. 



2 Strokes. 

Er. 
, Two. 



T'eu. 
A cover. 



10 



12. 



Jin. 
A man. 



Jin. 
A man. 



A 

;l 

AJuh. 
To eat 

A Pah. 
Eight. 

n 



13. 



14. 



Kiung. 
A limit. 

Mi. 

To cover. 



16. 



19. 



20. 



21. 



22. 



Ki. 

A bench. 

K'ang. 

A receptacle. 



Tau. 
A Kuife. 



Lih. 

[.Strength. 

Pau. 
To infold. 



Fang. 
A chest. 



rHi. 
To conceal. 



29. 



Shih. 
Ten. 

Poh. 

To divine. 



Tsih. 
A seal. 



Han. 

A shelter. 

S. 
Deflected. 

Yiu. 
Moreover. 



30. 



31. 



32. 



33. 



34. 



35. 



36. 



37. 



3 Strokes. 

K'eu. 

Tlie Mouth. 

We. 

To enclose. 



P 

±T'u. 
Ground, earth 

± 

X 

'^f Evening 



Sh. 

A scholar. 

Ch. 

To follow. 

Shuai. 
Walk slowly. 



38. 



39. 



^ 



Ta. 

Large. 

Nii. 
Female. 

Ts. 

A child. 



40. 



^. 1 - p . Mien. 

A cover. 



41 



«/L 
% 



Ts'un. 
An inch. 

Siau. 
Small. 



Yiu. 
Distorted. 



152 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



45. 



46. 



1=1 SI,. 



orpse. 



1 14 ch'ch. 

* I A sprout. 



.Shan. 
A liill. 



Ch'uan. 
A stream. 



48. 



49. 



JW 

« 

XKung. 
Work. 

►— » Ki. 

~r\ Kan. 

~| A shi 

>^V Yan. 
O -mr^ Small. 

rYien. 

54. :^ A J° 



50 



51 



53. 



Kin. 

A napkin. 



shield. 



A roof. 



urney. 
- I i -* Kun 

-U^ Yih. 
56 ^^ "^^'^ arrow, 



55 



Kung. 

oin bands. 



I — I Kung. 
7. *~;/ A bow. 



a. 



Ki. 

A swine's head. 



59. 



60. 



Shan, 
Feathers, hair. 



-O- Ch'ih. 

•^ A short step. 



4 Strokes, 




-5 /^ A doo 



65. 
66. 



leu. 
A hand. 



branch. 



P'ah. 
A blow. 



68. 



69. 



P^ Kin. 

y I A catty, a pound. 



Wen. 

Literature. 

Teu. 

A measure. 



A Square, 



-ir Fang. 
70.// ^S. 

aJCl wu 

Ti./twit 



ithout. 



timber. 



rt jih. 

j_| The sun, a day. 

0Yuih. 
To speak. 

p] Yiiih. 
J~\ The moon. 

-Jr* Muh. 

_ Xj V Wood, ti 

Aj-» Ch'ien. 

76. yV To owe. 

|K Ch. 

77. 11 ^ To stop. 

yiU Ch'u. 
79 J^^ Weapons. 

fJl Wu 
7/^ Doi 



73 



75, 



80. 



81. 



82. 



not. 

Pi. 

To compare. 



Mau. 
Hair. 



^/ I Shfie. 
y l' Water. 




Sh 

'I'Ik: family name. 



Chau. 
Claws. 



-/;> Fu. 

88. .^ ^'^ih^v. 

^^^r> Hiau. 
gg ^.^^ To imitate. 



90. 



JLI Ch'iiang. 
j\ A bed. 



91. 



92. 



93. I 



P'ien. 

A splinter. 

Ya. 

Teeth 

Niu. 
A cow. 



K'iiin, 
' A dog. 



5 Strokes. 



^4^ Hiiin. 
5. Y. l^'-^rk, 



97, 



98. 



sombre. 



Yuh. 

A gem. 



Kwa. 
A melon. 

Wa. 
A tile. 



Kan. 
Sweet, 



TABLE OF RADICALS. 



153 



100. 



^ 

m 



Sheng. 
Life. 

Yung. 
To use. 



lOL 

fflT'ien. 
A rield. 

103. /sL« 

rNih. 
Sick. 

y^ Poh. 
105. To separate. 



A piece of cloth. 



106. 



107. 



Pch. 
White. 



j>C Skin. 



Min. 
108. JJJXfc A vesseL 



109. 



no.^ 



Muh. 
r Tiie eyes. 

Men. 
A spear. 



JtH Sh. 

/V An arrow. 

in. .^V 

-7-^ Shih. 
>p~f A stone. 
112. 1-9 



113 



^1 Sh. 
^ I To show. 

J I I Jeu. 

j*^ To creep. 

115 ''^IV *''o^^^"o ^^' 

/f!r> Huih. 
116. >^ V ^ ^^^■^• 



-^> Lih. 

J J,- 9f^ To stand. 



6 Strokes. 



118. 



119. 



Chuh. 
Bamboo. 



4^ Mi. 

/[V Hulled rice. 



120. TpV^i'k 



121. TO 



122. 



Feu. 
Earthenware. 



Wang. 
A net. 



t^ Yang. 
123. * I ^ ^ sheep. 



^4 ^'"- 

24. -^^ Wings. 



125, 
126 



Lau. 
Aged, 



26. jTlj ^nd, still. 



127. 



Lc. 

A plough. 



2S. -^ '-^^^'^^ 



129. 

130. i;^-l 



M\ 



Liih. 

A pencil. 



Juh. 
Flesh. 



131. 



Ch'eng. 
A minister. 

Ts. 

Self, from. 



132. 

«^ Ch. 
133. ~rl To, most 



134. A 



Kiu. 
mortar. 



135. 



Sheh. 

The tongue. 



136. /T ^'■'■°^- 

151k Clieu. 

137. / tj A '^o^t- 



138. 

139. 
140. 






Ken. 
Perverse. 

Seh. 
Color. 



Ts'au. 
Grass. 



141. 



142. 



143, 



Hu. 

A tiger. 

iles. 



tft Ch'ung. 
■^T\ Reptiles 



>t-^ 



Hiiih. 
Blood. 



Hing. 




West. 



147. 

148. 

149. H 

150. 

151, 

152. 

153. 

154. >^S 

155^ 

156. ACr 



157. 
158. 
159. 
160. 
161. 



7 Strokes. 



Kien. 
To see. 

Kioh. 
Horn. 

Yien. 
Words. 

Kuh. 
A valley. 

Teu. 
Beans. 

Sh. 
Swine. 

Hie. 

Reptiles, wild beasts. 

Pe. 

Pearls. 

Ch'ih. 
Scarlet. 

Tseu. 
To walk. 

Tsuh. 
The foot. 

Shen. 
The body. 

Kii, ch'e. 
A chariot. 

Sin. 
Acrid. 

Ch'en. 
Hour. 



s 

$ 

^ 



^ 



^ 



Ts.ni. 
Motion. 




ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 



163 
164. 
165. 
166. 



Yin. 
Liquors. 

^ Ts'ai. 

SpltMiilor, to select 



Li. 

A mile. 



ISO. 



181 



:ja^ vin. 

|-— I 8()iiii(l. 



MVih. 



I, a leaf. 



,1,1 J''"n^'. 

'"« W iiid, a eustom. 



16 



8 Strokes. 



7. .Wl. 



Metal. 



16S. ^ j 
169. I J 

ft 



Ch'anc 
Long. 

Men. 
A gate. 



Feu. 

A mound. 



171. 



172. 



Ti. 

To extend to. 

Cluie. 
Fowls. 



173. I^W R-^in. 



^—^ Ts'ing. 

174. f*J Green. 

175. "T" p ^^'I'ong. 

9 Strokes. 



not? 



.76 M 



Mien. 
The face. 



Keh. 
177. - ' I ' *'Skin, change. 

-^ We. 
17S. ■'r|^ Leather. 

Ah Kiu. 

179. ^K ^*-'^^«- 



182. 

183. ^t ''•• "y- 
^^ Shih. 

184. ..^ 'I'oeat. 

|^-| hiien. 
185 F~| The head. 

3|C Hiang. 

186. F^ Incense. 

10 Strokes. 

tg Ma. 

187. >>»*/ ^ horse. 
^ttt> Kuli. 

188. ^ Bones. 

l:rt Kau. 

189. rWj High. 
p^ Piau. 

190. i^^ ^*^"^' ^''^'"^* 
Ten. 

o quarrel. 



191. 



192. 



n? 



Ch'ang. 

A fiagiant liquor, 



^Ct Keh, li. 
193. InrJ ^ tripod, urn, 

ft! Kvve. 

194_ yj **.^ A ghost, a devil. 



11 Strokes. 



Shu. 
i>()2. "ir^ Millet. 

i>i^ if.h. 
i'k ( h . 

204. |l|!| Kmbroiderjr, 

13 Strokes. 

m Min 

205. ncd ^ ^'■*^6- 

Mil Ting. 
200. tIR '^ tripod. 

207. i^y^ ^^ drum. 

mShu. 
A rat. 

14 Strokes. 

209. ' ^/y ^ ^''® nose. 

210. J^^ Jivcn, orderly. 

15 Strokes. 

Ch'. 

211. I A>^ The teeth. 

§3 Lung. 

212. ij ^ -^ liragon, 

16 Strokes. 

Kwe. 
*13. #1^!; -■^ tortoise. 

17 Strokes. 



195. >V»> 



196. 



197. 



198. /£i 

199.^ 



Yii. 
Fish. 

Niau. 
A bird. 

Lu. 
Brine. 

Luh. 
A deer. 

Meh. 
Wheat. 



214. 



IPtT Vnh. 
A riute. 



Ma. 
Hemp. 



200. >WI 

12 Strokes. 

201. ^^ 



Hwang. 
Yellow. 



1. 

i' One. 



VOCABULARY. 



155 



±Shang\ Above, np, upper, to 
go np. 

t| 'C%'ie, Moreover. 
^^ Pu\ Not. 
J--* jCVt'i, Seven. 

4g^ Sh\ The world, a generation. 

—r^ Hia\ Below, lower, to go 
I down. 

— * ^San, Three. 

T^Ting, A sting, a nail, an in- 
dividnal, to sustain. 



^ ^Ch'eng, To ride, avail of, a 
war chariot. 



/^f[ 'Kiu, A long time. 
^? i^ft*, To want, lack. 



warfish, di- 
minutive. 



2. 



I 



J^' 



Chung, Middle, to hit the 
centre. 



3. 



—LT 'C/iit, Lord, to control. 

y^ -^Wan, A hall, a pill. 

\\\^ ^Tan, Pale red, a sovereign 
77 r 



remedy. 

4. 



>^ 



■•^^ ,C/i, Sign of possessive case, 
^Cm Pronoun of the 3rd person. 

~rtj ^Nai, But, may-be, it is used 



as, I.e., or viz. 



-^^ -Hu, A sign of doubt, admi- 
■~J * ration, inquiry; also of the 
vocative. 



5- Zu 

I ^ 'I, One, curved. 

|L| ,Fe, Euphonic particle, eve 
nH also. 

ejl Loan\ Confusion, disorder. 

^M 'Kiu, Nine. 

^1 'Ju, Milk; a suckling. 

6. 



J 



"f 



Sh\ An act, affair, to serve. 

-tj Pronoun oi 1st person; to 
give. 

— ^ *Liau, Finished, a sign of the 
J past tense. 

7. - 

^ Er\ Two. 

'~kT iYiln, Speak, say. 

— T^ Ya\ Secondary. A diminn- 
■_trl tive prefix. 

— r^ jtj, In, ia respect to. 
^^'TTu, Five. 



15G 



ANA I.YTK'A I. UKADEK. 



pl //it', Reciprocal; in tnni. 

lyrt Kw'dvff, Much more, « /o?'- 
VU tiofi 

^hi Chi', Haste, urgency. 

~^ 8. 



>>w /*'''> Six. 
//p /', Also. 

T~^ jlFa-n^f, Perish, lose, flee. 

Fp JJhiiig, Great, the capital. 

«yLj-. JJhiaii, Intercourse, alter- 
_^iC» nate, reciprocal. 

■B. 'Hiang, Enjoy. 

9. X 

yV j/en, Man. 

AJX -Xai, Come. 

/T^ T8o\ Make, start, arise. 

/^ 'Sh, Send, caase, messenger. 

.fih'uen. Propagate, narrate. 
Po\ An uncle, a father's bro- 



'|jjT ,//o, Which? wliy? how? 
i^ Ch'di, Class, a plural smIHx. 

//^v -,Lun, A category, social re- 
llffl latious. 

/li. Tai', A generation, instead 
\\i of. 

'1™ Pe', Complete, pre[)ared. 

/ tl Pit', Prostrate, abject, to snb- 
W ject. 

'14^ J, Depend on, according to. 
u 1 ^'^^'^^0> As before, siill, yet. 
4^E J , Ceremony, form, manner. 
^W Pien\ Convenient, ready. 

y^^ Ling\ Command. 



Pi//, Impart, intrust, pay, 
commit to. 



€ 



16 



ther, a lord. 



>^ ^i7i', Belief, faithfulness, a 



4 



I PI letter. 

/^ JOhin, Now, modern. 

pi '/, To take, because, by 
"<!^ means of 

•fP Pa7i', But, only. 
!^ P'lt, Slave, servant. 



assent. 

/i:^ ^Siu, Improve, cultivate: re- 
11^ pair, long and slender. 

/qp?" -Jj, Prou. is^ pers. 

/y^ CJiiun\ Superior, fine-look- 
IX ing. 

oM. .C/m, Together, all. 
4yt Ch'eu\ Enmity. 

#-A -Pew, Humanity, charity, 
I--* goodness. 

ATflp Chien\ False assumption, 
Iq' blasphemy. 



Wei', False, deceitful. 
i| Li\ A cnstom, law, example. 
/(ra fiking. Overturn, a moment. 
/^ ,Shang, Wound, bruise; feel. 

Iii^ '^^''*' ^^^^^ on, wait in pre- 
|TJ' sence. 

<tHJ ,r-«, other, pronoun Srd pers. 

/;Y1 '^fi'Ji^i jj^''''. Bear office or bur- 
I jt den, ad libitum; let. 

4^5^ 'P(xu, Protect, secure. 
'lyr ,/, Pronoun ord pars. 
'Ifi -Pi', To cause, so that. 
1^ .^Hie, Together wiih. 
A^Su ,Kiing, Serve, minister. 

A\f ^<s^'i Seat, position, person. 

/nrt ^Eii, Likeness, companion, 
1^ pair. 

J^L ^'^^'^'^^O^i Like, simidacruTn. 

/A> Sw', Customary, common, 
I P coarse, usage. 

4-^ Fa\ Boast, cut, invade, 

Wu, To insult. 
'Fo, Buddha. 
-qS Hi\ To be, to concern. 
'^ CUe\ A hero. 



VOCABULARY. 157 

Jt-^ Ch\ Price, to meet, to man- 
|l]^ age, to take in turn. 

1^ sC/iVY/Aif/, Pay, recompense. 

A/C ,Hiu, Stop, good fortune. 

Xa(L P^'^ Double, ^ f§ three-fold, 
I P &c., to multiply. 
/t^ I', 'I'eu myriads, quiet, re- 
\tiU\ pose; to guess. 

AJ^ Yivb\ Divine protection. 

T^ -Fa, A captive. 

4S. 8\ To wait for, until. 

-Pien, Uneven, partial. 

Ts-o\ Sloping, oblique, at the 
side. 

-ISr jOIcHn, Usurp, oppress. , 
lyj '^'- ^'^^^' resemble. 

11 

'/, Rely, lean on. 



lis 'Chia, False, to borrow, sup- 
5C })use. 



JtJL. Chivng\ Rely on, weapon, 
\%. tight. 
/fSr '^^^'''^' Exactly, only, scarce- 

/^ She\ A cottage, to bestow, 
till cast away. 

/fi Chu\ Stop, dwell. 
/|^n Ttuigr, To look up. 

A^ ^Shen, Extend, explain. 

Chiv^, Altogether, empty, 
as you please. 



158 ANAI.VTICAL UKADKK. 

S Ch'eii, A class, a mate. 



^ fil/iou All. 

t ^Tfi^uc, Urge, expedite. 

^^- Fhi(j, Unite, combine ener- 
gies. 

4-f? Chia, Excolleut. 

4m {TUing, Lad, nrcbiu; page. 



pi Ti, Oonrtcons, geuerons. 

\i^ "Pang, If, shonld: % ^ free, 
m "oble. 

rjfit ^-^^^'» generons, careless, 
brave, soldier of fortune. 



Au\ Prond, insolent. 
<T^ JJng, A play actor, clever. 

>|||] Le', Smart, f^ % clever. 

/Jv| P^S Side ornaments, to 
i/'rV gird, wear at the side. 

'fhl TshL\ Hasten, shorten. 
^^ Chie\ Borrow. 

/f^ 'rs(?, Help. 

^^^ >Ch^iL, Provide, store, to se- 
ipR cond, to be second, 

qip Chiew, A piece, or article. 
r^S$^ Heu\ Wait, inquire for, time. 
^ Ck\ Wasteful. 



A~f- Par/', A comrade. 
ih-t '^'ii\ An associate. 
/flj^ ^m', stooping, 
■qyV iXcu, Crooked, bont. 

10- )l 

■y^ Jien, Before, first. 
yf* Hiung, Elder brother. 
A^ ,Kwang, Light, bright, lustre. 
iS 'Me7i, Avoid, forgive. 
^k Chmt\ An omen, a million. 
63 ,^r, A boy, child, a euphonic. 

"Jj^ arz^m, Primary, chief. 

-^ K'o\ Overbearing, to over- 
>U c( 



come. 



'^ ' ViXn, Promise, secure. 



yv^ Chie\ Attendant,usher, shield, 
)\ shellfish. 

,0, Sudden, lofty. 



Ch'ung, Fill, pretend. 

11. X 

^1 J?<S To enter. 

/. iCIiHuen, Complete, perfect; 

dS all. 

M'Xi(m^, Two, both, a tael or 
ounce. 

j^ 'Kei, Inside. 

12. A 

yl Pa\ Eight. 

n^ ,^i, A euphonic expletive. 



VOCABULARY. 



159 



jHl >C'/«", Pron. 3rd pers. 
, FPl yPi'i^g, A soldier, weapon 
_^V J-iimg, Public, just, dnkf 
■.lit Kimg\ Together, in 



com moo. 



^H , CV/iZ*, Complete, iustrumeuts. 
^Tien, A rule, to manage, to 



>*^ V mortg-age. 



^k:^ 



filden, To combiae. 
C/«'*, Expect, desire. 

13. n 

7sai', Again, the second time. 

14. ■^ 

TfiJ' ^Kwan\ kioan, A cap, crown. 
^^ iMing, Dark, obscure. 



/:^n!^ 



>•> 



^ 



15. 

^^ ,Le7^^, Cold. 

iLing, Insult, spurn, abandon. 
ftl ^Tiau^ Wither. 
:>^r*' iTung, Winter, to freeze. 
-^^ fih'i, Chilly, grievous. 

16. ;i 

PI iFan^ All, the world. 
ri Chi\ Bench, table. 

17. U 

rt;J a'w', Oat. 



J^ ^Ku, Protuberance, a teuou, 
1—4 convex. 

[m[ > ^'^ «) A pit, valley, concave. 

18. 7) 

t||J >Ch'ien, Before, formerly. 

/plj Z/', Gain, advantage, sharp. 

tJjI X/^'', Numerous, several, clas- 
7U sified. 

tjlj 7V, So, then, item. 
Tyll >Hing, Punishment. 
h/j ^^^''^^' Divide, cut. 

yj Jen", A blade, a sharp edge. 

r||I Pie\ Distinguish, other, 
^IJ don't. 

'TTp jF^'n; A part, duty. 

^j Ko\ (c) Jco, To cut. 
^ll P'an\ Divide, decide. 



/gil Ch'uang\ Originate, create, 
^y wound. 

•^Il Chien\ A sabre. 

Tl jT'att, A knife, sword. 

^ll K'o\(c),to, Carve, cut, gri- 
^'J ping, close, quarter of an 
hour, a moment. 

Ch\ Control, appoint, cos- 
tume, mourning habit. 

Il ,Kang, Hard, steel. 



lf)() ANALYTICAL READER. 

Tjj|| . "■' ' I Pierce, satirize, to cat 



tLfil Chu\ Excessive, violent iu- 
)^*\ crease, a farce, play. 
•^kI Ihva, carve, scratch, mark, 
jiilj rend asiuuler. 
--r;.! Kica\ (Scrape, include, em- 

p»] l)race. 

^ij ^P'eit, Divide. 

■JUIll j'^'/'-"'*'; '^^ expurgate, amend. 

19. 1J 

Jj Li\ Strength, force. 
"Tirj Clda, Add, increase. 
^Jtn yKung, Merit. 

i^ iLau, Toil, to reward. 

r^'-fr Le\ Extort, compel, curb, 
^J engrave. 

Jjgft Ch'i'iien\ Persua^le, exhort. 
H-h Chii\ Help. 
^jfl TaiKj, Move. 

H/J iCh'in, Industry, diligence. 

^j^ SJi, Force, power, posture 
^ of affairs. 

^Yung, Valor, brave. 



i/f Li\ Stimulate. 

'Mien, Encourage, earnest. 



20. ^ 

^ ^Y^l\ Must not. 



'TJj jPrtu, Wrap up, comprehend. 

^ >P-u, Creep. 
^ 'At, Crouch. 

21. b 

/K, y/z(v//, Transform, reform, 
1 \j waste, flower. 

Y^j 'Pi, A spoon. 

22. \1 

F§* Kwei\ A Chest. 

||ip' 'Fei, Worthless, is not. 

23. "C 

1^^ A^t^ Conceal, hide. 

p^ ,C/i-u, Place, space, room, 
pR. empty, 

24 + 

-4" Sh, Ten. 

^p* fih'ien, A thousand. 

2^ Tsit', End, die, a soldier. 

"ra >i\^a7i, South. 

^ Pano Half. 

-+1^ ^Sheng, Ascend. 

fffi Po', Erudite. 

^ip 'Ching, A well, market. 



VOCABULARY. 



161 



ffl^ ,Pe, Mean, lowly. 
/y * 'IFit, Noou, the first boar. 

25. |> 

K 'Pu, To diviue. 

L^ Chan, Observe auguries, 
1—1 usurp. 



26. 



P 



Hn C/a', Tbeu, even, i.e. 

M^ Chiuen', A roll, part of a 
^ book. 

pi J Yin\ Print, seal 
^p 'loan, Eggs. 

27. Z' 

C/ruie\ Pron. of 3rd pierson, 
also ira{)ersoual. 

iYue?i, Ongiuiil, of course. 



>^* S/ieii\ To receive. 
AV 'F/i<, A friend. 
j^ 'i^aw. Turn, contrary. 
^^ P'a?^^ To rebel. 

30. P 

rj 'K'eu, Mouth. 

::^PI illo, Harmony, mix, toge- 
TM ther with. 

"Hrf i/m^(5r', Decree, fate, life. 



1=1 



Shan\ Good. 



|s^ JBTew*, Thick, generous. 
jsjr F(3w', Satiate, disgust 

28. i* 

}s^ '/, An emphatic particle. 

ZJ^ Ctii\ Go, reject. 

^^ J's'an, ^sken, A trine, t 
<^^ ther, examine, accuse. 

29. X 

^f Yiu\ Also, again. 
]3V 'CAiZ, To take. 
^t ^^^' ^^^^> ^" addition. 



2^ Kau\ Inform, proclaim, ac- 
R cuse. 

pi ^K'o, Can, may. 

^ iMing, Name, fame, nominal. 

R3 TFe;iSAsk. 

Pi jr'«<??5', Together, like. 



C^ Ko\ Each, every. 
M 

"PJ ,/Sf, Control, manage. 
Ir! 'S', To inherit, succeed to. 



p^^ BeiC, A sovereign, an em- 
)X\ press. 

^-T fi^i^iun, A king, a chief. 

>^Pl Chau\ To summon. 

pT> jTsai, A note of admiration. 



m| Hiang\ Direction, towards. 
fl$ ,iyit, To call, to breathe. 



102 

"^^yf^ 'Fi'ii, If not, or not, other- 

Pl wise. 
>^^ fili'aiuj, Taste, a sign of the 

f^ past tense. 



5Bl 
PI 



jTFit, Pron. Is^ pers. sing 



it fiJiciL, Circumference, com 
mJ plete. 



•^J- ^Ko, Elder brother. 



AN'ALYI ICAL UEADKK. 

fihia. Excellent, anspicious. 

Che\ Wise, worthy. 
fl4 Ll\ Officials. 

-T> Vitt, Prosperity, bliss. 

^Yen, Severe, strict. 



" JU 'Zvu, Ancient. 
,^M^ '67t, History, recorder, censor. 
VlUC U\ Comparison, to inform. 
^3^ &^vng, Decease, loss. 
JEE^ 'Hi, Pleasure, joy. 



|g)A iHicn, All, entire. 
- pL^ CJii', Good luck. 
/rt Yiu\ The right hand. 
:23l C'/t'i, Vessel, instrument. 
Y=^ ^0*, To join, agree. 
JS9 jTan, Single, a list. 
—4^ jA'it, lo weep, cry. 

^PY Chm\ Fault, sin, harm. 

ri^ Sh, Greedy, vicious indulg- 
r*^ ence. 

P'^ ^Fa, Pha. I 

^-|J Li\ Hi. 1- Pharisee. 

jj^ Sai\ See. 

^ I ^Sliang, Merchant, to consult. 



Pyj* Cheii\ To curse, incantation. 
Ij^ ,67t'ue. To blow. 



jjT'iMi, To swallow. 

J^ >S7t', To devour. 

I ^ ^She, The tongue. 

^ ;S/iei(,', To sell. 
P 'Ch, Only. 

ir^ 'P'm, Class, grade, offerings. 

t| 'Xu, A family name, a mu- 
I— I sical scale. 

K'eLi\ Kot'o, knock the head, 
kuock at a door. 



PP 



Ch'aii, Ridicule, 
nTP , Yiln, Lick with the tongue. 







>\ fli, A span, 
^P* iT'ang, Name of a dynasty. 

Jb^ JIan, To contain, hold in 
^3 the mouth. 



^ ^Hil, Blow, puff. 
jjH" 'Tsii, To chew. 



VOCABULARY. 



163 



H* Chio'' ((?) chiaii, To masticate. 
PM Ch'ang\ To siug. 
M-^ jy^'*?', To ham, cautillate. 
Dm ^Hiuen, Noise. 
j^> 'C/i'-i, To open, begin. 



SI. 



pl| >Sf^^ Fonr. 

A ,Yin, Because, from. 
Kwo, Kingdom, nation. 



PJ .J{wei, Turn, return. 

■^Tii, A map, to plot. 

Ku\ Firm, of course. 
^ iYuen, A garden. 



S 



Kw'en\ Press, oppress. 

-Wet, Enclose, besiege, sur- 
round. 

IA>I ,Ch'iu, A prisoner. 
1^1 Yiu\ A park, garden. 



32. 



± 



~-|-* 'T% Ground, earth, opium. 

jVU Ti\ The earth, ground, a 
JniJ place. 

^^ ,CM, Foundation, estate. 
/4^ Tscu', In, on, at. 

-fih'eng, A city, a wall. 



-fih'ue^ To condescend, let 
down. 



Ching', Place, region. 
3-0 -^Fite'/i, A wall. 
^ Ch\ To hold, control, take. 
^[^ Pciu , To report, recompense. 
J^ -,rfu, The soil, dust. 
^ -,r'«7i(7, A hall. 
^^ iW'tt', A tomb, grave. 
^^^ Vang, Ground, soil. 
^ Tso', To sit. 
J^ s^'c^^Jt, An altar. 
iff To^ To fall. 
^ -,^'%, To daub, mortar. 
^^ -,Ch'en, Dust, earth. 
J^i fh'ang. An open ground. 
JR T'au, Level ground. 
JP| ,ir'o, Uneven ground. 
JR '^^'^' Crumbling, shattered. 



^ Hwai', Spoiled, ruined. 

^Chien, Firm, solid. 

Se, sai\ To stop up, boun- 



dary. 
T^ ^Tsevg, To add, increase. 

JS 'T'a, A tower. 

^^ jChimi, All, equal. 



1G4 



B^ yJian, May, can, endure. 
$rf Chan', A pit, a ravine. 



ANALYTICAL READER. 

5^ Tien', Fix, 0Ktal)li.sli, to make 



^Chie, Stairway-r 
^L S}m\ A scliool. 
Aj& Shi, A coop for fowls. 

*' 33. ± 

J-^ Sh'i', A scholar. 
:^J ^;iei6'. Age, longevity. 



34. 



X 



Hia\ Snramer, name of a 
dynasty of China. 

36. Af 

^To, Much, many. 

a/ Hi (c) -hi, Evening. 
^g^ M(y)7g\ A dream. 
^i^ Ye\ Night. 
^K Fai^', Outside. 

1^ Sii\ Early, north. 

37. i^ 

•-^ Ta', Great 

^P jT'-ieri, Heaven. 
>.-|^^ jj'u, A man, hnshand, fu-ts, 
]/V a teacher, fu-jin, a lady, 
/it, a euphonic particle. 

•^Ti^ T'ai\ Grand, vast. 



;;::^>C a iibiitioii. 

3^ Nai', How 1 

"^^ Fen', Earnest, energetic. 
tI^ * Chiang, To praise, exhort. 

J^ ^u', Mysterious. 

■Tjh^ CJiAa', To ap[)roach from 
y^ both sides; to press. 

^ A Vast, to gamble. 

Fent/, Obey, receive orders; 
carry in both hands. 

•^ >SA', To lose. 

To\ Snatch, seize. 
"pj -C/t'i, Rare, wonderful. 

"^..Hi, How? why? 

^S" jPew, To run. 

y ^^ Tseu', A report or memorial 
^^ to the sovereign, to strike 
u}) music. 

38. iC 

~nt 'A^*6, A woman, a daughter. 
^P -A. As, like, if. 

,C'hi, A wife, the chief wife. 

W A^iin', Tender, fresh. 
"hy 'Hail, Good. 

Wa7ig\ False, deceitful. 



F\i\ "Woman, wife. 
^Chil, To marry. 



VOCABULARY. 165 

^Sun, A grandson; gentle, 



Hing\ The family name, the 
family. 



yYing, An infant. 
Xf^ ^Ts'i, ^chie, 'chi, Elder sister. 
xNr Mie\ Younger sister. 
"n^ -Nu, A slave. 

"iuM P'^\ ^ i^^id servant. 

Chia\ To give in marriage. 

^Wei, Dignity, majesty, prow- 
ess. 

MyKii, A maiden, an annt, a 
wife's mother-in-law. 

"n'y Miau\ Admirable. 
^^2- 'T'o, Complete, satisfactory. 
,U, Delight. 



-Yen, Elegant, refined, deli- 
cate. 

Mie\ To smirk, flatter. 



39. If 

"Hp" Ts, Son, child, doctor, sir. 



ff 



- .^ Ts^^ Letters, the marriage 
" J " name, to love, nourish. 



Shu, Who ? which ? 

^Tsun, To retain, preserve, 
continue. 



:?^ 



|/|> yielding, 
-^rt?^, A child. 

Hiau\ Filial piety. 

-^j^ CA/i', A season, the last of 
" three. 



/ jy Yiin', Pregnant. 

•^"^ JT6•^, To multiply, to swarm. 



40. 



>^ 



, ;/, Proper, fitting, to set in 
H^ order. 



^^ JJhia, A family. 
-/^ '^71, Rest, quiet. 



t-tl'>S/ieu, To hold, maintain. 
"Qj* -*S/i, Solid, real. 



^1^ -Jung, The face, to tolerate. 
J^ ^SA,', A chamber, a house. 
^Kimg, A palace. 

^Tsai, A ruler, to slay. 

Ting, Certain, to fix, deter- 
,A£ mine. 

^^ Eai', To harm, injure. 
Pl^ ^Eiuen, To proclaim, publish. 



'* fih'in, To go to bed, sleep. 
^Shen, To examine, judge. 



Ififi 



ANALTTICAI- RKADF.R. 



/-"-:» ' t'J, A roof, honse, the cauopy 
'J of hejivni. 

^^ Fii\ Rich. 



J^surtg, Ancoator, chief, or- 
7T^ acle, staiidiird. 

*jd^ Ch'-a\ Search, examine, iu- 
:^r^ vestigate. 

\Pau., Precious. 

^Yifcn, Injury, spleen, blame. 

_j^ -Kwan, Officer, maudariu, to 
B govern. 

.}'m. To reverence; the 'ird 
\ ' of the 12 hours. 

K'o, A gnest, stranger, mer- 
chant, customer. 

jraL -T/»(7, Tranquil, rather. 

Kir'an, Large, generous, in- 
dulirent. 



--h^ .Hung, Great, vast. 



^t* C/>' , To lodge, convey, a re- 
Pj niiiiiidcr. 

41. -vj- 

~7| ln'itn'. An inc-h, 

j!^ ^Chiang, Take command, in- 
7|T| tend, will be or do. 

T((h\ To lead, 

^ 7'.s'?^», To respect, reverence. 
MkL Td^/'. Opposite, a pair, to 



compare. 



^J^^ J//', Close, secret, intimate. 
■^R 'Ch'iing, Favor, affection. 
' ^T '^?^'«, Destitute, few, a widow. 



»ES Ckwen, Special, sole. 
• vj" 

3^^ .Eiiln, To seek, afterwards. 
i>| ,/6V^^, To seal, appoint, 
jS"^ 5/i^*, To shoot. 

42. ^J> 

•j> '>Sf/a?<, Small. 

'^■Ji *Skfu, Few, young. 



«.^ i: 5?^', A constellation, to pass a 
i0 night, lodge. 

}7m', Indulge, pardon. 

^ -,//(XW, Cold, frigid. 

'lit* 

^^^ .^Eican, The globe, a circoit. 



>fl> Shang*, Ch'ang, Above, to 
[^ exalt, yet. 

43, ;^ 

j?|r (?/»■«', Then, thereon, come to. 
"TT^ ^Yiii, Blame, fault, more. 

44. p 

FH -A7, Near, familiar. 
^Cliil, To dwell, locate. 



VOCABVLAKy. 



167 



n V (c) u'H, A house. 

M ^S/tu, To belong to, to enjoin. 
^LiL Sandals, to walk, an in- 



come. 



r^ ,S/i, A corpse, an effigy. 
hcC ,Sh, A (lead body. 
f? 'CA', A foot, a rule. 

Chie', To reach, arrive at. 
^Lii, Often, repeatedly. 
©■ -JTs'eng, A story, or stratum. 

46. jJ4 

1 1 I ^Shan, Hill, mountain. 
J^3L -.Ch'img, Lofty, to reverence. 

.^Yicn, A cliff, precipice. 

Ta«f, An island. 

,Kang, A steep high hill. 

I-M 

t=r^ Ngau\ A shore, bank. 



^^ JPeng^ To fall, death of a 
^r\ prince. 

^^ -J^un, A peak, summit. 

MJ .Laji, Mountain mist; a blue 
mU tinge. 



^ -/OZ;'/, liough, uaevea. 
|W,C7.';Z, Rugged. 

STai, A steep bank, a cliff. 

C}Lia\ A mountain pass, a 
strait. 



^ Tai\ The Taishan mts. 
[--jr Yi^-, A mountain. 



Zk^ fih'in, Lofty, sublime. 
_^^ /', A dizzy height. 
[||g Chang\ A chain of hills. 
Hhrt. ^Chevg, Eminent. 
IjIa^ -,Yung, Conspicuous. 
^Feng^ A peak. 



47. ;ii 

Irl ^C/^^'M, An island, continent, 
/ J I district. 

I j I ^Cleioen, A stream. 
^ft -fihaii, A nest, a lair. 

48. X 

I ^Kimg, Work, mechanism. 

-^-^ Tsc", The left hand, wrong, 
/H to aid. 

t| Chil^, Huge, chief. 

-y^ ,C/i*a, ,c/^'ai, Difference, error, 
/tI send. 

J5 'Ch'iau, Skilful, cunning. 

49. ^ 

r-| 7, Already, to stop, a eu- 
1^ phonic final. 
pel ,Pa, A grip, handful, blow, 
i -^ name of a place, sign of 
the optative, 



168 



ANALYTICAL UKADKR. 



p 'Cki, Self, reflex prou. 

50. rji 

|Tl Chiit, A turban, cap, kerchief. 
^^ 77', A ruler, supreme majesty. 

,///, To exi)ect, riire. 

Mu\ Teut, tabernacle- 



,S/^, A master, army, multi- 
tude. 

Fii\ Cotton cloth, to spread 
abroad. 

f^ fh'aug. Constant, always, 
X\$ common. 









A market. 



5/*, Matting, feast, meal; pro- 
fessor's chair. 

^S Tai\ A belt, draw, convey. 
|jj|& P'a', A veil, a kerchief. 

iV, Silk stuff, wealth, money. 

51. ^ 

^tH .xV/cv?, a. year. 

~T^ ^^a«, A shield, to offend, 

I serious consequences. 

^J^^ Ping'', United, also, even. 
-^^ iPing, Level, just 



52. i; 

,C/ti, ^c/ii, How, almost. 



r/<^'. Tender, youth, young. 

mjA Yiu\ Gloomy, dismal. 

^r-t II wan. Transform, sleight of 
•^J hand. 

53. f^ 

jfe 'P-i, To protect. 
T/, Bottom. 
^ Hwang, Broad- 
Shu\ All, almost. 

|l;i5' iV, To set aside, waste. 

rfar J*!!^*, A degree, to measure, 
/J^^ estimate. 



i 



IaK Ti>o\ A seat, throne. 

'^ 'iw, A mansion. 

-J'ung, Constant, common, 
simple, to hire. 

K'ii, Treasury. 
^ ,K'ang, Tranquil, opulent. 
Ia|t -Lang^ Portico, verandah. 
1^ Eic\ Preface, order, a college. 
i^ .^Siang, Academy, asylum. 
Jj^ fh% A kitchen. 



vocabulary: 
(| S\ A privy, to cleanse, 
C/iiu\ Stable. 
InF ^Hiu, To protect, shelter. 
'rtj jP'a?^, Kitchen, butcher's stall. 
-T'ing, A halL 

54. l__ 



169 



Chien\ To build, lay a foun- 
dation. 

- Yen, To prolong, to invite. 
PJ .Jlwe, To turn back. 

55. -^ 

•-V* /', An arrow. 

i. Sh\ A model, a prop, to lean 



^ 



on. 



57. ■^ 



^Ck'iang, ^ch'iang. Strong, vio- 
lent. 

K-^ fihang, Extend, stretch, bend. 

^ Fu\ Not. 

-^^ Ti\ Younger brother, dis- 
^^ ciple. 

C I ' Yin, To lead, introduction. 

\-\ ^Kwig, A bow. 

GS Jo\ Weak, feeble. 

Ktft ^T'a/i, Beat a harp, a ball. 



fi-Rra jM, More, to stop. 

59. ^ 

4f>^ -/ling, Form, body. 

•^^ fihang, Display, illustrate. 

-i^A 'Ts'ai, Brilliant, ornate. 



M^ 



^</ 



\K ^Ying, Shadow. 



60. :^ 

Fu\ Return, again. 

' Wang, To go. 
>f3: Je* {c) pi, Obtain, get, can. . 
>^ 'Pi, That, adj. pron. 
^55 iTs'ung, Follow, from. 

T'm, Disciple, in vain, only. 



A^ Eeu^, After, posterity. 

AJXd I\ To serve, a low official, 
'iJiiC. police runner. 

^nk <^^'^^' ^^'^"^^' subtile. 
>?i Tae', Treat, wait. 

/IS -Hiiin, Comply, according to. 

i^ Te\ Virtue. 



>{ 



fJheng, Advauce, invade, con- 
quer. 

jCheng, Test, examine, act. 
::^ C/^^/i(/', A path. 



170 



ANALYTICAL READKR. 



/f|It 'Tang, Loll, stroll, lounge. 
Aj^ -Jang, Koviug, straying. 
X^ .//u, Gradual, at leisure. 



61. 



>^ 



A \ >'5^^' Heart. 

11^ ,Tre, Only, but, think. 

Jgui i\'cf()', ?^;iA Evil, bate. 

^^ ^1/', Love. 

"g* /*, Thought, intention. 

iy'^ Pi', Certainly, must. 

iV^ Ping', Nature. 



1^ ^Kan, Feel, excite feeling. 
^ F^^', Sudden. 
>77 Vew, Unfeeling, patient. 
•r{" ^K'ung, Apprehension, lest. 



Wi '^^^'^> I^egret, repent. 
>|*ft rue\ Please, be pleased. 

^^ Si', All, to investigate. 

^ How', Im, Tempt, doubt, wa- 

iLi> ver. 
pi .tj, Dull, stupid. 



fe ;T^««^, Forget. 
ij*^ ,S7/, To rely on. 

^^ y^"> ^^9^^' CJrace. 

ifllL ■^"*' Compassion, i)ity. 

— |-f C/;/, Inclination, will, history, 
^Li^ to record. 

^^1^ Nie?i\ Thought, to read. 

Ai^ -fi/i'ing, Passions, affairs, na- 
I Yl turul feelings. 

^ Si\ Rest, cease. 

^H^ tF', Better, to heal. 

J»^ -^Heng, Persevering, perma- 

|M ' neut. 

^IvV^ -^Hivai, Bosom, to feel, cher- 

VM ish. 

^V ^Kung, Respect. 

■^^ Pa?^', Violent, sudden. 

^W .C/^'2'6w, Guilt. 

If^ J F2n9f, y? w^*, Answer, ought 

Si j-S. To think. 

TBu '-^'^^' Compassion. 



S\ Hua7i\ Affliction. 
7^ , Yiu, Sorrow, grief. 
«|ffi Chii', Dread. 
^ iW, Auger. 



/Ua> 



^e^;e*, Smartness, wisdom. 



£X^ .Ts% Mercy, tenderness. 
^^^ -P'inq, Proof, to rest on. 
4*^ Ha7i\ Hate, dislike. 
^^ C/^^■^ (c) fhi, Haste, urgency. 



VOGABULART. 



171 



^A. '^\ Passion, desire, appetite. 
*iii S/ie7i\ Cautious, precise. 
^Hiang, To think, desire. 



J>j^ Wu\ Conscious, awake, to 
I PI understand. 

t^f Lil'^, To care, be anxious, 
A»@« think about. 

*V^ yllwan, Pleasure. 

^Si Hwe\ Comfort, kiudness. 

i^u£ -J-'^^^i Pity, love. 

Tm '^^'' -^^orfit, spare, love. 

B-d* ^'^'j Soothe, comfort, sup- 
4^^ port. 

.jT^ Chung, Loyal, faithful. 
4*:^ C'hid, Dignified. 

XSC ^^^ > Hate, abhor. 

J6^ -Z\ Think of, remember, con- 
\M!^ jecture. 

1^ il/a72*. Slow, disrespect, 
*I*M Xr, Tremble, dread. 



*[& <tT, Mistake, error. 
^y ^Ts^img, Haste. 
J^Wf ^Ein, Delight. 
^^ ChH7ig\ Felicity. 
~3Ay '^''*'*' Shame. 
/Fi?^ Z/ew* To dote. 
y^ Kw'ai\ Quick, joyous. 
}X ^Ts'u7i, Think, suspect. 

*W ^Simg, Awe. 

^Hwang, Dread, apprehen- 



)» 



sion. 



^L'i. 



X^|2^ Yuen*-, Blame, resent, discon- 
"iCjs tent. 

le^ •Hiuen, Suspend. 
^7J** iFen\ Anger, rage. 
*Il* iMang, Hurried, busy. 

Mu^, Desire, admire, 

|I»J^ -Chien, phan. Repent, a pen- 
itential prayer. 



Jj- ^Ewang, Hurry, confused. 
j^ T'e\ Fault, evil, badness. 
v^ '^'^'* ^sv^rence. 
^^ {TsaJi, Shame. 
^p Tui\ Vexation, hate. 
X^C. <^^^'^^^^» Reform. 

62. 



^ 



=^ Ewo\ Or, either, suppose, 
r?A^ some one. 



''Wo, I, pron. Is^; pers. 
nV, fh'eng, Make complete. 
^V i^^^ Cut to j)ieces, 
ffij£ C?Aa;i', Fight, battle. 
-A^ j-ffb, A pike, a weapon. 



172 



Trg Ch'e\ To ( 
7PC nonuce. 



ANALYTICAL READKR. 

caution, forbid, re 



^^ C/n\ A relative, sorrow. 

Tai', AVear, or bear ou the 
bead. 

C/iia', A lance, jolting, stam- 
mering. 

63. ^ 

t| iru\ A door, family, owner. 
1^ Le\ Offend, perverse. 
-Fang, House, room. 



64. ^ 



.^ 'Sheu, Hand. 

-il/o, {c) ^mo. Feel with the 
hand. 

^^T tiVa, Take, seize. 



J'^^ .//«, -/i>, Convey, carry. 
ttl^C/<r, Strike. 
<fcij j-SaM, Sweep. 

Jfi^ C/zii', Hold, proof, 

J. PI 

j^ jFan^, Spread, display. 

^^ C/«e', Receive, connect. 

iBH i^('^h Handle, feel with the 
on liaud. 

if^* jFi^d/z, Rescne, snccor. 

-^TJ >^^^^^^' To beckon, call togeth- 
•fPl er. 

ip^ Po\ Scatter, winnow. 



aS^S Scatter. 
v^ ,La, Draw. 
5K f^^^'^9> S^^^' snccor. 
1 Pai', Worship, bow down. 
^«', According to. 
Jflh jiV^o, Remove, change place of. 
3^ jT'gM, Plunge, cast. 
^g 'C/m. Elevate, all. 
irt 'CAi, Finger, to point. 
JHi XV, Pawn, seal, escort. 



-J^H, Handle, take np. 
#njr -^Ti, Oppose, balance. 
ip C/i/<:', Resist. 
y^" /Ts'ai, Talent, ability. 

4^ Sheu\ Entrust, impart. 
ddb -F?/, Sustain. 
i^ -C//, Hold, control. 
JS C/^o', (c) .(:hai, Choose, select, 
ift ,7''2«, Push. 
JuJ I\ Or, either, repress. 
i4r 'Mo, Wipe, blot, paint. 
jTi-'^w, Hold fast, manage. 



VOCABULARY. 

^> ,Chav^g, The palm, hold, con- |^ ,^.^^^^ ^^.^^ ^^^^^^^^^ 



173 



^Jang^ Rob, lay bare, oppose. 

-fih'eng, Receive, thanks, suc- 
ceed. 



fihiueii, Contribute, offer. 

"Xul Pau\ Nnrse, embrace, hng. 

4;^ -J^au, Shake, rock, scull a 
IB-I boat. 

4i^ '7a, Whip, scourge. 
iT Ta, Strike, beat. 



iW, Propose, decide. 

'VtZ- Gho^ {c) -fho, Break open, 
g[/ I take apart. 

'P'm, Capture, seize. 



Chen\ Arouse, stir up. 
C7i*, Cast, throw. 

fihHen^ Take hold, seize. 

5jC T'ar^, /Mn, Test, try, sound, 
inquire. 

^K /Jh'-au, Transcribe, confiscate, 
short-cut. 

"^Jtjn To\ Open, inaugurate. 

^F'an^ Cling, hold to. 

jP'ae, Arrange, spread out, 
^j/ iP% Cover, cloak. 



'S '^Fa;^, Draw back. 

^Hwe, Wield, manage. 

* {n ^^^^ Beat, play on a harp. 
VtX ^V ai,p'o\ Pat, tap. 

-^Ij Ch'e, Check, hinder, draw 
^ * lots. 

'-j^ 'Ts'ai, Pick up, cull. 

Pa', Pluck up, follow, assist. 
f 'rt 8k\ Gather, pick up. 

* %]L ^^'^*' Break, snap. 



C/^/V, Strip, break. 

^ C//?ii', Handful, to take with 
^J both hands. 

* ')^ -Jjau, (c) J((u, Grasp, seize. 

* /l2 >P''^^^-> ^ast, throw away. 

* 'S jT'oan, Kuead, compress. 



m 



Sie, Carry in the hand. 



65. ^ 



>/^ advan 



iverge, prop, succor, 
vance money. 



66. J^ 



Ti\, (c) p, Rival, enemy. 

3CA* Ch', To cause, so that, in- 
it^ vestigate, 

, Ktc\ A cause, reason, there- 

^^ fore. 



174 ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 

-^h Kiau\ Teacli, train, doctriiic. 
ttX. reliijioii. 

Kiu\ Save. 

Shu, Number, destiny. 

X^yf 'Kai, Change, reform. 
ifr^ 'Kan, Dare. 
Jj^ ^Kung, Attack, work at. 
/ptl/ Ching\ Respect, reverence. 

14 Y Pai', Defeat, waste, decay. 

tlir ^^"-'i '-^^^^ Scatter. 
jn^ Cheng\ Government, politics. 
ilx^ .-S/i^M, Receive, collect. 
j\)f Fang\ Release, let loose. 
HjL '-^^'^^' Examine, search. 



i/ -,Fu, Spread, diffuse. 






4 



m 



67. % 

-Wen, Literature, figures. 
'Fe, Elegant. 

68. ly 

^Teu, A peck measure, the 
Great Bear. 

Liau\ Materials to conject- 
ure. 

69. /r 

'So, Which, what; where. 



.5, This. 

. Toa)i\ (.'ut, break, by all 
I means. 

Jf^ 0/i\ Rebuke. 

'm]X y^^^-' New, renew. 
hr* jC/iin, A catty, an a.\e. 

—ft* yFang, Square, place, method, 
yj just before. 

iife T5i<', Family clan. 
TTs^' -tj, In, on, pertaining to. 
^ ,^'a^y, Side. 

Mjj ,S/t, Give, bestow. 

-La- 'Z?Z, Stranger, compiinj-, 
>(fJX batallion. 

-Eiuen, Revolve, in turn. 



71. % 

WJC Chi\ Since, already. 
y[^ -Wii, Without, privative. 

72. 

H J'i', Sun, a day. 

pY' »Se', Formerly, anciently. 
gg -Ming, Bright, understand ; 



B. 



Ming j'i, to-morrow ; ming 
nien, next year. 



-^tT iShV, To be, right. 

P^ .S/^, Time, hour. 



VOCABULARY. 



175 



Pm >^^"^^' Shine, display. 



^ Ch\ Wisdom 



Frt 'C/^, Will, decree, taste. 
n^ Jw^, Dark, obscure. 
^^ r, Change, easy. 

P^ 3'[e\ Obscure, blinded. 
■^gy CA^M*^, Noon, daytime. 
HW 'PFaw, Evening, night. 
»&. TAftM, Early. 

Kwa7?g\ Barren ; desert. 



J 3 ^Kwhin, Elder brother, a 
1^ worm. 

•^^ 'P'2^, Far and wide. 
J^^ -fli'-en, Morning, early. 

£ yUiiiff, A star. 
^^ J0h'a7ig, Prosperous. 
Sy Chan\ Brief, temporary. 
;^5;. i/u*. Evening, twilight. 
&^ Ti\ Instead, fail. 






C/i?', Also; more, end. 



iQ^ Ckang\ Comfortable, copious, 
expansive. 



B^ <CA'/>?^, Clear. 



a 



¥ 



-^Yang, Bright, fair. 
Ea?i\ Dry weather. 



fih'-un, Sjiring, 



jg^ 'A'z^;^, Sun-dial. 

^^ Fe-ji*, Evening. 

n^ '^^?"«?A Morning, to know, 
MtC make known. 

^Se*, Bright, discriminate. 
0^ Yir,9\ Shi 



^. 



line on, image. 



Noan, Warm ; mild. 

_gL 'Cking, Admirable, pictur- 
^j\ esque. 

Tan\ Morning. 
''hJ (Him, Ten days, 

73. 

}-*I Im^*, Speak, said, called. 



^ 



Hwe\ Meet, can. 

j-S/m, "Write, book. 

/Ts'au, Class, sign of plnral. 



>g^ (Ts'-eng ,tseng, Sign of past 
^ tense, a family name. 

^^ Tswe*, Most. 



^Keng, Change, more. 
Uh CAV, Crooked, injury, song. 
S ^o', Why not ? 



Drag. 



176 



ANALYTICAL HKADRR. 



74. ^ 

/T3 'Yfu, To have, to be. 
^;^ Yiu\ ludnlge, forgive. 

Q Yue\ MooQ, mouth. 

d:^ \Va}ig\ Look towards, hope, 

-f^ aspect, repute. 

YiEl -<^''^'^» ///a?/, Morning, tovv- 

-J7^ ards, palace, do homage. 

cirfe Shenq\ Conquer, bear, snr- 

m p^ss. 

-JJhH, Period, expect. 
Fu' (c) -fu, Submit, hug. 
-^P'eng, Friend. 
So\ North, first of a mouth. 

75. /K 

^ We\mtyet 

~Ltt >Siang, Mutual, together, 

^fcj help. 

y C Mu\ Wood, timber. 

^ i^ ^Pen, Root, origin. 
fe ^ , Tung, East. 
Jmj Shu\ Tree, to plant. 
-^i ^Kwo, Fruit, really. 
^.FMiigr, Glory. 
^^g^ L(9*, yo*, IV, Joy, masic. 
:^ ai', Collect. 
/f^Jt ^^^^*» Extreme, limit. 
r+J|l C/i'i', Reject, leave, cast away. 



Ye\ Business, property, fi- 

t^ ually. 

^ .^Clt'iaen, Authority, a steel- 
yard weight, an exception. 

-rfr Mo\ Tree top, end, tip end, 
-^V no more, worthless. 

^J5 Chia\ Frame. 

/i^ T'iau, A rod, a classifier of 
|>l> long things, an article, a 
law. 



Shu\ Bind, control, encase. 
Kai*, A stable. 

^ ,C/<2*, Engine, opportunity. 
CA*, Plant, fix. 
tS )^"*^"» Root. 

Jleng, Perverse, crosswise. 
jC/«, Thorns, brambles. 
|»^ ,C/^ A branch. 
V ,Pe, A cup. 



''Kan, Chinese olive, it be- 
louors to the terebinthaceae. 



^{5 'Lan, A Idnd of olive; the 
J^ canarium. 

jbj^ 'Pan, Plank, board. 
>fct r/^«*, Pillar, prop. 
%^ Yang\ Sample, pattern. 

-JL,eu, Loft, story. 

J\^-u, "Withered. 



I 



I; 



VOCABrLARY. 



177 



T^ Ho\ Seed, keruel, compare, 
>^ search. 

/jv> lio\ Reform, come. 

/|»Ar Chang\ Staff, cudgel, leau ou. 

,^i^ ^Meu, An}-, a certain one. 

^^ -^i^/^<, Pattern, samjde. 
j^ 'Ch'ia, Model, ' 

^yK -Lin, Forest, grove. 
/Kad* ^2e\ Terrace, arbor. 

Tmt '^'<^^' Railing, cage. 

>Wrt (^^, Door lintel. 

>rS ^'^^'j Join, trnss of a house. 

/^v4 .^Ts'ai, Materials. 
7^ T'a*, A couch. 

/^S" *Ch'u, Paper, mulberry. 
/ »S lYang, Poplar, aspen. 
»|P *L?i^ Willow. 
^rt i^^^^i {^^ ornamental tree 



76. X 

/f^ C/«'gw', Lack, owe, debt. 
/^/^ ZJ', Wish, desire, will. 

^^^y^ T's% Order, next in order. 

H^l* -t^, A final expressing admi- 
yvV ration. 



^Hwa7i, Joy, to like. 
jlji^ ,Hin, Delight. 

jC/i'i^ Deceive, insalfc. 



/ »ml {r'ung, l^with large leaves. 
f)|jC .r'az^. Peach. 



^^^ *Z/^, Plum, liing-li, baggage. 



^Sung, Pine, fir. 

>lJp| Po* ^Pai, Cedar, cypress. 

Cha^, Stockade, fence or pen 
of open work. 



OTA >^^^ A song. 



^En, Sing, chant, recite. 



T7. jh 

g^ ,/i^^^7g, Return, render, yield, 
Jtrp belong. 

||-^ 'C/«, Stop, cease, only. 

ML?', Pass over, away, succes- 
sive, experience. 

Cheng\ (c) ^cheng^ Upright, 
correct, virtuous. 

-r^ ' Wu, Military, used for jnc, a 
Jt-V^ step. 

l^a^ ^we', A year, season. 

^^ Pi^', Step. 

iL-Jb jC'A'/, Diverge, forked, c/^'2 lu 
i'Vv a bye-way. 



JE 



178 



ANALYTICAL READKK. 



78. ^ 

/^ -i'Vai, Evil, bad. 
7jf£. '5, Death. 
^Jt ,Shn, Different, really. 
V'^ i^'^'Vnj, (Jriiel, barbarous. 
7^C j^"^"^'^' ^"^^^^^ destroy, perish. 
A^^ Taa', Insecure, almost.. 
4^^ Sliancj^ Untimely death. 
vrL '-^^^J Dissolution, death. 






79. 

■^-^ ^Shu, A spear. 
^H/ ^/ict^ fc; ,s/ia, To kill. 
' " Tien\ Temple. 



@tt* *i^^t'e, Destroy. 
J^ , Yin, Great, flourishing. 
^Pan, A kind, the same. 
^^^-'.} Shell, hu.k. 

80. ^ 

■/rr , TFit, {ivii, Do not, a denial. 
-^ 'il/u, Mother. 
^^^ 'ilfe, Each, every. 

Tii\ (c) j^<6, Poison. 



^Hf i/'^ Cherish, brood, nurture. 



81. ib 

J^K Ti, To compare. 



.^^^ -^Mau, Hair, wool. 



^E* 



♦ .Haic, Hair, down, a mote. 



83. ^ 



ft 



J/m, People, a plebeian. 

Sh\ Family, suffix to family 
name of a woman or other 
persou. 



84. 



-V. 



/=i»- Ch'i\ Breath, any gaseous 
:^V body, matter, auger. 

85. tJc 

7 \^ ^Shui, Water. 

\ ^ Ch^iu, Seek, desire, pray. 



_ Fa', Law, mode, method. 
^ ire??, Tepid, warm, mild. 
^Ju, Thou. 

Vx ^^^^'' ^^^^' ^^^' ^°^' °^' 
5jak Shen, Deep. 

^■4^ ,<Sf^, To wash. 

jPJ -i/'o, River, canal. 

^/Q CVt', Govern, manage. " 



;J>b ,Sha, Saud. 

ViwJ ^Cheu, Island, contineut 

if& -P'*'^^ Divide, appoint. 



'i7«i, The sea. 
^^,Tfu, Filthy. 
Vra/ MeS Quench, destroy. 
>y?/-' .C/i'ie, Cleanse, purity. 



Po, A wave. 
jS Htvo' (c) -Jiwo, Alive, mobile. 
;W ^C/iiw, Wine. 

^^ ,rm, Oil. 

\^ -im, Flow, glide. 

ylt 'Yung, Long, for ever. 

V^ CVa', Cross a ferry, to succor. 

^^^ -Ym, Adulterous, profligate, 
\^i excess. 

jfprt ^Ch'ing, Pure, clear. 



VOCABULARY. 179 

Vl2 .J^i, Mud. 

Y^ ^.se-, A pool, favor. 

x|^ Kivan\ Pour, irrigate. 
±^ Cli'iuen, Fountain, money. 

J\^ ^Kiang, River. 
VdE - Ycmg, Ocean. 

^^ 'i^i■a^^, Full. 

i)S\ <-^'"^^'^' Source, fountain. 



Ylll -^Hung, Great, vast. 

YA^ .Chan, Moisten, tinge, iufect. 

j/.^^ O/io*, Wash, wash the feet. 

^jJL, Mil, Bathe, bathe the head, 
'|/jV receive favor. 

iHn" Chien, Gradual. 



-^Hu, Lake. 

ViSr ^*''^'' Name of a river, of a 
dynasty, of the Chinese. 

.Ch'en, To sink, perish. 

^\Ak -^Lun, Eddy, gulf, sink, per- 
iW isla. 

1^ '^'^' Thirst. 

V^ ,P'm, Bank, brink. 

sj^W So\ Trace up, go against the 
current. 






Leu\ Leak, omit. 

Tit", Ferry, to cross over. 

^Siau, Melt, waste away. 
\i^- 'Lau, Flood, excess of rain. 
7_p, -^Feu, Float, swim, superficial. 
Yh TTet', Name of a turbid river. 

,Chin, A ford, ferry. 



180 



ANALYTICAL RKADRR. 



V/f^ /S'Ar/, To wade, concern. 

Tehl Ch'au, Tide, damp. 

%jd^ iHivangi, A lake, pool, chwang 
\>\ hiuang, embellisbmeut. 



m^'i 



Names of rivers. 



V4iA -^Lin, Drip, trickle. 

Mil 

4m i^'^'^^^' ^ torrent. 

W^ Chi', Excite, impede. 

*)6^ i/ftii' , A flood, excess, snper- 
iml fluous, intrusive, uomiual. 

Ts'e\ Estimate, measure. 



^^ T'ai\ Vast, quiet, opulent. 
'Ghii, An islet, sandbank. 
Ts'ue\ To dip, dye. 

^rtj jC/i'm, To swim. 

^^ j(S/a, fcj s7ii', Wet, damjx 
13^^ moist. 

5^^ T'^i', To weep. 
jn?> Ze', Tears. 

V^ ^cxit', Vast. 
.Yuen, Abyss. 



,Ts, To multiply. 



86. 

J^ 'Hivo, Fire. 
4ffi JFit, Not. 



K 



^**\ 



-=^ ,i'«^i, Euphonic. 



1^ jT^Kei, Be, become, make, do. 
WC j./rt7i, So, vet. 

^^cjk -Viw/, Plan, plot, camp, le- 
@l yiou. 

^f5 Fen, Consume. 

>y U Zie*, Fierce, brave. 

t^^ ,>ru, A crow, black, what? 
>»^ wliere ? how ! 

S\^ /fsai, Calamity. 

^kwi ^^'^^' Burn. 
7JA| j-^^^^' Smoke, tobacco. 
a?7 '-^'^^^' Destroy by fire. 
jK|a .J'-'^^, Kindle. 
f^S ^Teng, A lamp. 
Mm Chau\ Shine, enlighten. 



i»v> 



^»»> 



/o', Heat. 

^Hiiln, Merit. 

.^an, Vex, perplex, trouble. 



^wjs >Sie', Temper, mingle, blend. 



;4Flb Teu', .-(/e?!, A swallow, a feast. 



ra; C}ii\ Kindle. 
^j£ Foi', Flame. 
i]B^ ,S/io', Flash, explode. 
JM 'rs'au, Brilliant. 



VOCABULARY. 

iVm Lan\ Bright, toru, rotten. 
aj^ ,Hwei, Splendor. 
)rR, -Hwang, Lustre. 
^^ .P'eng, Bake, roast. 
|S.li yHi, Bright, glorious. 



181 



JU\ 



"Chu, Boil, cook. 



87. 



J^ 



•r \Y jCheng, Contend, strive. 
-^^ -Yuen, Therefore, at, in, next. 
Tsio\ Rank, title, office. 



88. 



^ 



-^ Fu, Father. 

.^Ye, Father, combined in 
various titles. 

89. It 

'Er, Thou, a particle. 

90. ^ 

tI/tC -P^''^(^''^9> Bed, bedstead. 

91. j- 

y-y F'ien\ A strip, slip, leaf. 

I 

92. ^. 

^ Ja, Teeth. 



^ Fiu*, Door, window, to in- 
struct. 



/; 



93. -^ 

TFu', Thing, animal 
■ ^T *' ji\^'iit, Cow, ox. 

Jl 'iftt, Male. 

db T'e', Special, intentional, an 
'TT ox. 

T^t^ A calf. 

VtjL^ M'^\ Shepherd, herdsman. 

^^g JJh'ien, Lead, draw. 

iLrfj. ^Shenff, Cattle, beasts for sa- 
tlSl crifice. 



ti 



»^t^ ~Lau, Firm, prison, a victim 
•^^f-* for sacrifice. 



94. 

^^ -,rm, Yet, like 



X 



gX ?7', Prison, law-suit. 
pair Shell', Wild beast. 
j^TT Hien\ Present, offer. 
^|J i?'a7^', Violate, offend. 
/^M Hwo\ hu\ Take, obtain. 
>l>t| Tu', Alone, single, only. 

-Kw'ang, Mad, foolish, sport. 
Ch'uin, A dog. 



:^ 



lip .s/., 



A lion. 



>i Chwanff\ Form, a lawyer's 
brief. 



1S2 

>U|tX nia\ Narrow, stupid. 

^j Lie\ Catcli, liuiit. 

95. ± 

^i Sliwai', Lead, imitate, all. 

^^ ;i\. This, it. 

^/^ -Hiuen, Sombre, mysterious. 

96. i 



— I-^ jirrt/)?^, King, prince 



ANAI.YTICM, KKADFR. 



J ///»/, (yoral. 

2^Ll» -,X'm, A kind of precioas 
llT . stone. 

L<i oij, Neck ornaments. 



. ^ 7/^6, Amber. 

h 



Kill, Ebony. 

Ti<'n, Lustre of a jjem. 
J5^ 'Ts'an, Sparkling. 
-F-V^ ./('/i' Auspicious. 



97. jjk 



aCtft ,,-• . ■ -1 rfv jAVrt, A melon 

yp x.t, A principle, to govern, /^\ 



^^ She\ A harp of many strings. 
^r^ -Htvan, A ring, circle, around. 
Wt ,Pa?i, Class, to distribute. 
^-rC f^^', Gem, jade. 
^^ -Ch'in, Harp, lute. 
J^ ,Chen, Pearl. 

>i^ -C/i'iu, Globe. 

fihi, An astronomical Ie- 
7% strumeut. 

jplf Wan\ Joy, amusement. 
Jjt rie?^^ A flaw. 
jH 'Er, Ear-ring, pendant. 
J^ ^C/iu, Pearl, jewel. 
Jw^ P'i^, A precious gem. 
J^Y .Heng, Emerald. 



98. J^ 

^f^ 'TTo., Title, earthen-ware. 

99. -y* 

Shen\ (c) js/ie'^i, Intense, ex- 
cessive, to the extent of. 

Hg* ^Kan, Sweet, willing. 

100. ^ 

fcl-* ^Shenp, Life, to impart life ; 

"t1 produce. 

- ^;;2 'Ch'an, To give birth, an es- 
}^1 tate. 

!jt 'S^'W', '^0 revive. 

101. ^ 

B3 Vu7iy\ Use. 



VOCABULARY. 



102. 

__ 1\ Differeut, strange, 

^^ yTanrf, Ought, proper, in, on. 
jXl - Y/u, From, out of. 

fiJ yS/feii, Extend, rep 
,T'ien, Field. 
-Na?i, A male, a son 
C/ae\ Bouudarv. 



eat. 



Hil', c}i'u\ Store up, cattle, 

P3 to breed. 

Pi\ Ended, finished. 

^^ iLiu, Detain, delay. 

[•Jl C//ia\ Mail, a cyclic char- 

j acter, the first. 

-^3" We, Fear, reverence. 

\^ Lio\ Brief, com})endious, 
^=^3^ tactics. 

PK fh'eu, A field. 

^1^ ^Fan, Footstep, change, a 
P3 time or times, barbarous, 
foreign. 

.yj> Fi\ Give, bestow, 
fiS- Chiang, Bound, limit. 



^. 



.ffoja', Painting, a pen stroke. 



'^l 'Mil, A mow, 7260 sq. ft. 

103. jiE 

IP 'P'^■, A piece of cloth. 



183 

used also for M to 



^^ -/, Doubt, 
y>Pu decide. 

^ ,Shu^ Herbs, open, coarse 



^ 'Cleu, Pain, grief. 

104. f^ 

Ping\ Sickness. 
C}a\ Malady. 
^^ T'ung\ ^t'eng. Pain. 
j//en, A scar, a blow. 

105. y^ 

^T^ ^Teng^ Ascend. 

-Fa^ Ja, Raise, start, produce. 



106. iQ 



A hundred. 



1=4 'Pa/. 

•fe^ ,CA/d^ All. 

tl P6>', -pai, White. 

y^ .Htoang, Greatest, emperor. 

H>l Ti\ Target, exact, a particle. 

107. j^ 

)j^ .P% Skin. 

108. jnL 

P, More, advantage. 



ML 

fc^ Shenq\ Full, abundant. 

j^ C7;-t'/2i7, Fill. 



184 



ANALYTICAL RKADER. 



. Vh)(j, Full, overflowiug. 

7^1^ Chin, Exhaust, finish, alto- 
inL j;ether. 

l^-T Chi€n\ Note, survey. 

JUL 

^ no\ Why not ? 

nil '-^^'"^ Vessel, instrument. 
^^ Taw', Rob. 

59 .Menq, Alliance, pact. 
:W^ jP'aw, Dish, board. 
H^^ 7'a??/, A tub, large, enlarge. 

109. g 

ta. ,C/^c«, True. 
^^ Tm', Supervise. 
^S* Chmg\ Blany. 



Q i/?^'. Eye. 



^ Ghiuen\ A relative, to pro- 
tect. 



Ch\ Straight. 

Ch\ Locate, dispose of. 

^J^ 'Shig, 's/ievg, Examine, spare, 
province. 

^K'an, Look, see. 
'Yen, Eyes. 
^ 'Ku, Blind. 
^ irz^;'e', Blind. 



PJ^ C/«/, Observe intently. 



.^Mioi, Slnniber. 
Hffi 'S'^'^*^', Sleep. 
Bm *^^"'^''' Wink of an eye. 
n^v P'ait, Look, hope. 
I r-z', A glance. 



110. ^ 

■^r^ .^Mau, Spear. 

TR^ ^"^^Z, Business, earnestly. 

«?^ , C/«>?, Boast, admire, pity. 

111. ^ 

^P, a, Know. 

"^^ *S/^*, Arrow, an oath. 

4S *r()aw, Short. 

4^1 ^/SAen, How much more. 

112. -^ 

l^ SU {c) .^sh'iy Stone. 

P'o\ Break, burst, open, 
IS iP'cin, A broad rock. 
-^0 (c) ^mo, A millstone. 



^ .Chan, Look at. 



ir fLe'i^, Sulphur. 

•^5 Ch'ing\ A stone bell or cym- 
^ bal. 

37tt, Cornelian, a yard, uu- 

SqI merical figures. 



VOCABULARY. 



185 



Jn^ iTa?^, Agate, cornelian. 
■ '•- ^ Wti, A fine stone, but not a 



i^em. 



/n^ ,Fu, A stone, a false gem. 
J^ Ch'w, Solid, real, reliable. 

113. ^ 

jljjH -^S//e?7, God, spirit. 
^:z^ 7'si\ Sacrifice, ofFerinc:. 

jjjS Fti\ Happiness. 

ffilHi '^^' Rites, politeness, pro- 
)VSS.. priety. 

jP ISk', To view, to treat. 



^^ Ckm\ Prohibit. 



C/iu\ -flm, Bless, pray. 
|fl)f fih% Pray, beg. 
ll^^ '2a«^, Supplicate, pray. 
!r^ 2^^^'^^ Misery, calamity. 



,— -^^ Sh^, Show, inform, a procla- 
^J^ mation. 



^Tsu, Grandfather, ancestor. 
'ZTu, Bliss, prosperity. 

JlitL '^'' S^c'^ifice, offering. 
^U, Withstand, resist. 
-Sianff, Prosperity, luck, 

114. f&I 

-CkHn, Fowls, birds. 



115. 7^ 

"^^ -^ffo, Growing rice. 

m^ )Su, Revive, Yesu, Jesus. 

•ttb* ,C'/t'^?2g', Praise, address, 
a-n* weigh, fit. 

^T^ AV, Grain. 

/jC^ ,5, Private, selfish. 

4*ffl Chung' , Plant, kind, sort. 



'g? jC/«', Search, examine. 

'P/?<(7, Hold fast, adhere, 
handful. 

^^k ^si', Collect, store up. 



S/(ue\ Taxes, duties. 
i^ Etve\ Filth. 
/F^ -J, Move, change. 
a^ ,P?", Secret. 
4^ -C/i'eng, Road, jonrney. 
tEJ|^ ,C^'m, Autumn. 
ilM 'i^2W, Store-house. 
/l^. ' 1F(2?2, Firm, secure. 



>3^ Sm\ Bloom, flourish, elegant. 



Mii\ Sublime, benign. 



116. ^ 



FV Blue*, Cave, tomb. 



186 

./Q*- J\U(vg, Kiiipty, 



A N A I-YTICA r, RKA I)FR. 



^7V N 



j|_ We .it>/, rerseciitc. 

-Uf .^Ch'-iung, Exhaust, poor. 



'f^ r//'/^'', steal, stealthy. 
^A^ ^Ch'iuncj, Lofty, canopy of 



JlCilN Ml. 



-X^ T'ii\ SmMeu, rush. 

-Jt. K/u, Search ont. 
ji^j^ ^Chw'ang, Window. 
jK'e^V/, Pry, spy. 

117. ± 

W Li\ Stand. 

^^ fihang, Chapter, display. 

JuUt ^Toan, Correct, au item, com- 
•Tlll mencemeut. 

H^ ',T-iwg, Boy, maiden. 
"^B C//zV, Exhaust, complete. 
^^ C///»i^', Finally. 
j^ Chii'-, Wait, expect. 
•Srt Ching\ Strive, earnest. 



118. ^ 



T?*, Nnmber, mansion, only. 
f=^ ^ r^'/j^/. Class, eqnal, &c. 
Art C//?>', Joint, verse. 
^^ C/r^<S Found, build. 



^^ ^P-ien, Essay, chapter, sec- 
m\ tion. 

-"T T ^ S/riu', Li\n<^\\, smile. 

ll4j '^^^'^^''^^> Brief, convenient. 
;Ff';^ Feast, invite. 



tfi ^Tu, Real, sincere. 
"pdr Kivan, Govern. 

Soaii^, Estinjate, calculate. 
^^ , T^r??, Hairpin. 
Jgjfj C/(^<', Chopstick. 



Yi 



'Pi, Pencil. 
C/;^//, Bamboo. 
Siau, Flute, flageolet. 



:^S jf/, Flute, piper. 



119. ^ 



M//, Rice. 



j^^ €1(2710, Esseuce, fine, accu- 
TPJ ^ rate. 

^Ts'u, Coarse. 

.Liaiig, Provender. 
j^V^ 'Fen, Starch, flour. 



120. ^ 



^Ai Fo', Agreement, narrow, spar- 



/l»J mor. 



VOCABULARY. 



187 



S^t, Plain, nnadorned, ordi- 
uary, hitherto. 

^lU Si', Fine, small. 



^1 ^ -Fa?7, Numerons, abnuchmt. 
mXU -fih'un, Pnre, sincere, perfect. 



t ht \- T> *■•[ „^f^,.^ ^jiJ MF«»rt', A net 

Xi£h '^^^- Rp^'TT^^) tneretore, I /|>|i2j -" 

/I^C i)re-establislied i armony, 



*^>^ filmng. End, final, not at all. 

W^ Cliie\ Tie, connect. 

^X^ JF<?, Connect, only, merely. 
^iM )Tsmig, Generally, altoge- 



•wr ^Ticng, Entire, general. 
wpl Chme\ Cut off, extinguish. 



^"pt C/^?', Period of 12 years, a 
/FU record. 

>^7^ ^Ching, Rale, classic, warp, 
/[ol longitude, experience. 

2^1^ ,P/e;«, To twine, compose 
/Mln verses or books. 



*JaI ^ci\ Pay, give, receive. 
^a ^/^^', ('-') "chi, 'kei, Give. 
"flwl >^^''^^^9^ Main priucij^les. 

Floss, cottony silk, 
extended, connected. 



-Miefi, 



^ ^ Tsiing, Let loose, suppose, a 
direct line. 



'^_ -Hang, Red. 
^^ ChaiL, A rip, rent, hole. 
^^ '/S'(9, A cord, to seek. 

Hi\ Tie, bind. 
«-^ i7/', Family line, connect. 



^=^ ' 1^'^, Transverse, woof, lat- 
/P^ itude. 

^TT* Mie7i\ Fine threads, counect- 
TpiMj ed tho ight, pouder. 



W^^ ^Liau Wind around, envi- 
v^^ ^Jctii, ron, saunter. 



^^ 'i?t, A filament, a nice dis- 
*^< tinction. 

vj^^* 7V, Indissolubly joined, 



'F»0 adg 



apted. 
i"S ^^'2, Silk gauze. 

■K^ -,C/i'z, Grass cloth. 



^^ ,Hi, Hemp cloth. 
^m Siii\ Embroider, decorate. 
mK J*^' ^^^^ thread, raw silk. , 
*Mt Lu\ Green. 



K^ C/^r, To succeed, connect with. ' ^^ 'M Often, entangle. 



188 

J^^ Ch\ Weave. 

j&rl TsM, Fringe, tape, badge of 

?[>Jx office. 

:&ilt fif''''^'^'y Draw threads fur 



ANALYTICAL RKADER. 



/l*^l| weaving, silk, pongee, 
Y^ P, Draw out, unravel. 



>hXX Chi\ Twist, join, continue, 
?py compose ; pursue, seize. 



121. -^ 



Ch'iue^ Deficit, few, gap, of- 
ficial post. 

122. f^ 

Tsi(e\ Sin, guilt. 



^fh :Lo, A net, gauze. 
,--|^^ '^aw, Rare, admire. 
f|| i^sj', Punish, fine. 

-Li, lo, Encounter evil, grief. 

^Shu, Yamen, office, manage, 
act pro tempore. 

R^j ^ Wang, "Without, privative. 

12-3. ^ 

HR -^Yanff, Sheep, goat. 



-C/i'iiln, Herd. 

r, Justice, righteousness, 
kindness, friendship, pa- 
triotism. 



^ 'Me, 



Beautiful. 



- H ru. A'a^/, Lamb. 

^^ /S/«, Shame. 

;-;!; >SV^';/, Covet, long for. 

T ^ /S7/«?i, Fetid, rank odor. 

124. 3^ 

iTa^f*, A quill. 



^ A Wing, aid. 
^1 *S'i', Hepeat, imitate, learn. 
i-ll ^Chlen, Destrov. 

Ts'ue\ A green bird. 
"jf|^ To\ yau\ Splendor. 
^^ Hi' , Unite, combine. 

''Chu, To soar. 

*Siang, Gj'rate. 

-^Au, Hover. 



fhHau, Higb, raise the head. 



7UL 



125. 

^Che, A relative ref. to per- 
sons and thin<i:s. 

^Lau, Old, aged. 

Z^ST ;C/i'?, Aged, an elder. 

^^^ ^Kett, Superannuated, wrin- 

126. Jfo 

|[p ,£•/', And, but. 



VOCABULARY. 



189 



"pjc* fihwen, Solely, bent on. 
|^.V«', Patience, perseverance, 

127. ^ 

128. :^ 

jj^ '^r, Ear, a euphonic. 
••^P Sheng\ Sacred, sage, holy. 
StM ,T'm_^, Hear, allow. 



i-pvi -Wen, Hear, perceive. 

TTrt jYe, Interrogative final, Ye 
-«*^j4 sw, Jesns. 

f^'^^ /Sheriff, Sound, report, fame. 



^8 



C/m', Collect. 



ld(ll ^Ts'ung, Wise, quick-eared. 
^ (7/i', Office. 



^^ -JLung, Deaf. 



Byp -Jjien, Unite, connect. 

129. ^ 

^ Chavb\ Commence, found. 
^t(/*, Solemn, serious. 
/', Practice, labor. 

130. ^ . 

ttt* xNeTig, Able, can. 



^ Ju , jeu', Flesh. 
To\ Extricate. 



yKaw, Grease, anoint. 



iA^ Pel', Back, carry on the back, 
pj turn the back, recite. 

te ,T'ai, The womb. 

P=4 U\ Rear, nurture. 

^ 'K'en, Willing. 
mb -JFe, Leg bones. 
Q2^ ,Fei, Fat. 
H]^ Ta72., Gall, courage. 
H^ 'i^tt, Bosom, belly. 
-^Fu, Skin. 

^Pau, Womb. 
H/^ 'P'i, Conception, fostus. 
HJw -J^u, Order, record. 

Htt fill, Fat, essence. 

_L|:| ^Hu, Why ? Northern bar- 
R/J bariaus. 

HB ySing, A fishy odor. 
^i;*^ - Tail, Meats, viands. 

Loan, Minced meat. 



j^T" 3^,j^^ Decayed, rotten. 
p=| jiTfX, Altogether, almost. 

131. g 

pj .fill' en. Officer, liege. 
jfei -Lm, Arrive; confront. 



100 

iMl ]V( \ Lie down, sloo]). 

t^ 7V, Self, of conrso, from. 
Jb^ IIiu',ch'eu\ To smell, stench. 

.. K Ch', x\rrivo at, most. 
^ij Tau\ To, at, arrive. 
*^* -^T'ai, Terrace, stjige. 
^Chen, Arrive at, most. 

134. p 



ANALYTICAL RKADRR. 



^^ 



^fe^ ^U, With, give, iuterros,- 
^k ative ? 

4^ Chill, Old, aucieut. 

ffiU Hing, Uise, raise, flourish. 



1 -59. -^ 

./^^ Se\ \sh.ah, Color, Ijeauty, siu- 
I ^ siiality. 

140. Il't 

l^l W(i,v\ A myriad, all. 

lfe!l ./r/, Tf. sii{)pose, like, that, 
/fz^ his, its. 

■^-^ 7iai', Because, covt^r. 

"31^ Hum, Flower, glory. 

-^^ .Me/tiff, Simple, cover, receive 
^^ favor. 



-^ 7i'H, Bitter. 
Tsanff\ later. 



,^, Bear aloft, sustain. 

135. -^ 

.qb> /S/ie, Cottage, yield, give up. 

137. j^ 

-+M* ^Cheit, Ship, vessel. 
iW^^ -(Jhtv'en, Boat, ship. 

138. ^ 

"ipT -JLianq, Good, virtuous, ra- 
^ the'r. 

fikien, Difficult. 



^^^ -Z/iew, Water lily. 

1^^ .Jjcm, A flower, Aglaia odor- 



Hra^ -Ts'anq, Conceal, store. 

Tf^' Himng, AYild, waste, hi 

-^ 

.^^ jl/o', No, not, must uot 



j\v^ iYing, Bloom, brave, heroic. 

}y ,Hwa, Flower. 

Chie\ Reliance, pretext, re- 
pf cord. 



.J'au, 



Grape. 



^ Cho\ chib\ To send, publish, 
disphi)'. An affix expres- 
sive of completion. 



VOCABULARY. 



191 



^:gr Lo\ laii, Fall. 

'Kelt, If, doubtful, irreg-alar. 



JTs'ang, Azure. 
JK Po', -j>a'ii, Thin. 

gifi iTu^ Protect. 

~fj:^ Ho, Lotus, to bear, receive 
m luvor. 

ll?^ Pi', Veil, to ob^cui'e. 
^ip *Miau, Minute, slight. 
^^ } o', 2/«^<'^ Medicine. 
^5^ -.W^w, Weeds, rubbish. 
"^K^ 'Hang, Death of a uoble. 

^Kxuo, Fruits. 
•"i^ Fe', Leaves. 

j6V, or J^, To revive. 



&i^ 'Ts'au, Grass. 

trt -^Miau, Germ, aboriginal. 

r^ il/ait', Flourishing, abundant. 

Chie)i\ Recommend. 
'Ko (c) -ho, Flax. 



•jj*;^ Yin^ Shade, b}- privilege of 
1^ birth. 

Yuen\ Pasture, park. 
' JFcmg, Fragrance. 



^^ /', Planf, cultivate, cra.fr, art. 
^_^ Hu\ Nourish, hoard. 
^S Ts'ai\ Herbs. 

^,F6, Potherbs. 

:+^ -^Ku)'e, Malvaceous plants, 
^5^ the sunflower. 

>^ CA.ie^ Mustard. 

>Q^ ,P<?''?', Perfume of flowers. 
-^^ Tanq', Vagrant, vast, waste- 

i^ ful. 

Luxuriant. 



141. 

'Ch'ti,, Cku\ Place, dwell, to 
place. 

Hau,\ Sign, title, cry. 

Ch'ien, Earnest, devout. 
t^ Nio', Oppress, injure. 
r^ ^Lo, Prisoner, ravage. 

142. ^ 

^^ ,^7ie. Serpent. 

!^ i¥i*, Honey. 

ib^ -^C/iHcn^r, Insect, worm. 

/f»^ -il/an, Savage. 

jlo, A Small sea shell. 



192 



ANALYTICAL KRAnER. 



w}A -Hivang, Locust. 
UlLJ ,7/irt, Shrimp, crawfish. 
llirt ^J^o, Ovster, muscle. 
j^=^ -/r.s'an, Silk-worm. 

,C/iU, Spider. 

^Yin, Earth-worm. 

fih'an, A kind of locust. 
i r, Ants. 



lY/'fo, Flies. 

143. jf[L 
144. ^t 

y[-f jFnif/, hang, Walk, act, hong. 

,C7i/6, Street. 

We\ Protect, defend. 
^J Shu\ Method. 



-C/^'it, Street, road. 
W -,Heng, Transverse. 

*^VY"F(??2, Inundate, amplify. 

■^}f^ -Jliuen, Brag, boast, display, 
'J?J for P^ to dazzle. 

145. ^ 

]^£ ,7, Clothes. 
;^ ,a'M, Beginning. 



P^^', Hcccive, prefi.x to pas- 
sive verbs. 



'^tV ,/, Posterity, tribe. 

-^* Ai, Grief, sorrow, melan- 
-5< choly. 

^^ 'S'i', Lurk, take by surprise, 



hereditary. 
"^ft filmng, Heart, nature. 

^^ CVi', Manufacture. 

"^^ Shiva I , Decay. 

ij, P'oAi, Mantle, robe. 



^^ .^Nang, Bag, sack, yesterday. 



H' 



Pi/, Patch, mend. 



^ 'Plan, Outside, display, ex- 

uui[)le. 

'Lo, Naked. 



>^* .(Jh'-ang, Clothes, lower gar- 
ments. 

^ Fii\ Rej)eated, double. 
-fih'iu, Jacket, vest, 
^ ,Chin, Skirt. 

^m Siu\ Sleeve. 

;Mil )Chwang, x^dorn, repair, lade 
^^C '<^ ship. 



^^ -Ts'ai, Cut, trim, shear. 
^A Lie', Rend, tear. 



VOCABULAKT. 



193 



146. 

[)tj )S'^> West. 



m 



fcM^ 



Fau*, Wish, will, important. 

Fu\ Reply, repeat, overturn. 

Ho\ Investigate, search, ve- 
rify, distinguish. 



147. ^ 



^3 Ckien', hien, See, be seen, 
y^ appear. 

^B jOA'm, Kindred, intimacy, 
?5^ self, own. 

Hien*, At present, appear. 

^Kwan, Behold, consider. 

Chio\ chiau\ Conscious, feel, 
awake. 

So Tu\ Look, see. 

■jtttt Chin\ Interview with a su- 
^^ perior. 

sB T-i*^, See, face to face. 
Mi\ Seek. 

148. ^ 

BB (7/uo*, ^chiau, Horn, corner. 

'Chie, Untie, explain. 

-Ku, Square, law, plan, a 
square vessel, a wine cup. 



I=t 



-Yen, Words, speak. 



1^ We\ Say, call. 

^d^ film, Many, all, plural pre- 
H^ fix, in, at. 

gjjl Hiun\ Instruct. 

^^h. (Siang, Full, minute, in de- 

!^^ P'i\ Compare, parable. 
^ Sh\ Try, 



endeavor. 



^H(i ^'' ■^*^^^^» command. 

5^ Ohie\ Ordinance, command- 
ment. 



^ 
^ 



-^Mo, Plan, plot. 



.^^ yKai, Ought, altogether, the 
]g^ said. 

^Hm /S-ie', To thank, to decline. 
gA^ 'JTu, Promise, approve; much. 

gtj Tsu, Curse, imprecation. 

^:^ 'Ch'ing, Invite, request, in- 
Pf3 quire. 

^^ ^sa7^^ Praise. 
gp, CAi', Record, remember. 
qW JJh'eng, Sincere, honest. 
g^ Cheng\ Evidence, witness. 
^5 '?/, Words, discourse. 

SB 



r, Visit. 



rtj£ ^SVayo^ Speak, narrative. 



)01 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



C]ii\ Count, calculate. 



Mi 

gffi .Shuo, Who? 

g^ Jang, Yield, relinquish. 

^/^ Lun\ -Jiun, Discourse, trea- 
PIIIJ tise. 

^^ Sh\ Oath, swear. 

Sh\ Know, remember. 
rt^ /', Discuss, negotiate. 



^^ Pien\ Turn, change. 
gj^ Sung\ Accuse, law-suit. 

gm jTs' Words, verses, statement. 

^Ip ^'o', fcj ^t'o, Entrust, pre- 
pXrf tend. 

^J^ Chau\ Edict, proclamation 
Ppl by the sovereign. 

-.;!%■ 

g^ Yiu\ Win, beguile, persuade. 

Q» ifwe', Instruct, admonish. 



gM ^Eu, Recite, sing. 
Hm Simq\ Read, recite. 
^f ,»S/i, Verses, poetry. 



'Chiang, Speak, discourse. 

^-p Tc6%', Birth, advent of a 
gX" great man, great, false. 

Im '^^^''^^''^' Rebuke, punish. 

gjnT 'Zwe, Deceit. 

^^ 'Ch'ien, Modest. 



^^ Tit', (c) ,tu, Read. 

^»^ ./c9i', Recognize, acknow- 
0>b'» ledge. 

^^ yKw'a, Boast. 

PF1 



CMe', Inquire. 



ttjft 'Chin, Careful, respectful. 
-JJ, Praise. 



fc=a 



g^ -^"'''^'' Slander. 



^Itt 



gau TFit', Mistake, error. 



Miu\ Error. 



•^pET -^T'iau, tiau, Turn, temper, 
|:|/fy mix, musical air. 

^^ Pien\ Eloquent, distinguish, 

vindicate. 

rtM* IV, Frightened, astonished. 
gS 'C/iVtn, Flattery. 

O^ >C/a, Ridicule. 



j^ -JP'ing, Censure, criticism. 



^flC 'I^'it''^^' Sing. 



g'B^ jfl^-ie, Harmony. 

O/m*, Who? How? 
^^ ^Pu, Record, catalogue. 



,TscvL, Consult, inquire. 



1^^ ^Ching, Warn, caution, ex- 
~^^ hort, to respect. 



VOCABULARY. 



195 



150. :ig: 

^ Kn\ Valley. 

151. ;g 



Hi 



^^'(7/1% How? 
^Feng, Opulent. 



..•^ 



^JjDL 



Yen\ Beauty. 



152. ^ 



\i. ^Siang, Elephant, ivory, fi- 
'^ gure, emblem. 

iPing, Name of a state. 
.^T'un, A pig. 



^^ -Hau, Rich, opulent. 

S^^ i^^ Beforehand, doubt, sus- 
4^\ picion, luxury. 

153. ^ 

Mau\ Appearance, face. 
Mo\ Barbarian. 

154. 

H^ Ts', Bestow, confer, 
Shu^, Redeem. 



Fvl, Bear on the back, turn 
the back; repudiate obliga- 
tions. 

• y^ * Che^ (c) .}se. Rebuke, reprove. 



.Ts'ai, Riches. 
"S* Kwei', Honorable. 



C Sai\ Vie, display. 



•Y 



P'iw, Poor. 
Hwo\ Goods. 

jPit*, Conferred by heaven. 

CK, Talent, matter, pledge, 
hostao-e. 



jTan, Covet 
^ 'ifcti Buy. 
W il^ai', Sell. 
^ Kung\ Tribute. 
^* jMe'T?,, Worthy, wise, gifted. 



,Pm, Guest, retainer. 

^Shang, Reward. 

J Tse* (c) ^tsei, Thief, steal, in- 
jure. 

^Ts, Means, supply, rely on. 



p-f^ Chu\ Hoard, store up. 

JKeng, Repeat or continue a 



song. 

155. /)is 

/IK/ She^, Forgive. 
TH^ G'^\ I^sd, sincere, earnest. 
Ho\ Awful, majestic. 



156. 

Yue\ Pass, leap over. 

' Cki, Rise, raise, 

^Tseu, Walk, run, run away. 



lOG 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



W >^'^''"'> I^""' ^"'•^ towards. 
Fit, Go. 
L'h'cn\ Avail of. 

157. ^ 

LiC, lload, way. 
^^ Tsio* (c) pu, Foot, enough. 

aicri', Tread. 

Chi\ Track. 

Kwei\ Kneel. 
Kg Tait, Tread, stamp on, 
^h C/a', Going back and forth. 

Clm\ To walk unsteadily. 

JJhu, Overleaping, hesitating. 

.^Ch'eu, Undecided. 

Chi\ Cling, climb, rise. 



^ 



iKxmg, Person, self, 
ini ,C7t% Body, person. 

159. 



v|^ T'icm', Leap. 
Yo\ Spring, 
'Sien, Barefoot. 



ij;^ Yo\ Spring, dance. 



^Si Kwei\ Kneel. 

158. 



To walk reverently. 



iShen, Body, person. 



;|^ ,C/m ych'e, AVagon, chariot. 
M# Chiau*, Compare. 
yCJdun, Army, 
Hia', Control. 
Tsai\ Convey, a year. 
Ch'ing, Light. 
Pei\ Class, grade, generation. 

1 1^ -Lun, Wheel. 

- ^&i ^Shu, Rotate, pay out, lose, 
™0n be beaten. 

J Chwen, Turn. 

^Hwe, Splendor, lustre. 

-^U, Imperial domain. 

p 'Fu, Spokes of a wheel, with 
ffl next to collect. 

^Ts'eu, Hub of a wheel. 

^^ 'Fw, Aid. 

JIung, Booming, as of can- 
non. 

160. ^ 

Hiiig\ Fortunate. 
,Kii, Offence, guilt. 
jT's, Words, to decline. 



VOCABULARY. 



197 



Pien, Distinguish. 
' V -^ ^Sin, Bitter, acrid. 

161. 



Ju\ Shame, disgrace. 
-Nung, Husbandman. 
-^Ch'en, Time, the 6th hour. 



162. 



^ 



h|^^ ySue, Then, thereon, at once. 

^H ^Chia, A Buddhist name. 
>^^ Tcfcu*, Way, method, truth, 



doctrine, reason. 
Kwo\ Pass, cross over, trans- 
gress. 

^TS <^'a^, Escape, fly. 



H[^S ^Hiuen, Select, choose. 

-j[B ^Chue, Pursue, 

jr^ Tsau\ Create, make. 

"1^^ ' Yuen, Far, long. 

I^F Pi*, Avoid, escape, 

JP^ Tai', Until. 

'jPo-ti, Return. 

Sh\ Meet, suit, go. 

-/, Omit, transmit, let fall, 



"y^Si leave behind. 

JTsun, Observe, obey. 



i^ *C]^ien, Send. 



>j±^ 



J^ ^TTe, Oppose, withdraw from. 
Jl^^ iVt', Contrary, resist. 
HrS jTsau, Meet, encounter. 
^^ jT% Path, road, 

Pien', Everywhere. 

Su^ (c) .^su, Hasten. 

jT'ung, Open, reasonable. 

^^ Ta\ Open, intelligent, pros- 
It^r perous. 



M 



CAu', Eject, persecute. 
^)y Chin', Near. 

jYlxu, Invite. 

>S^/iu*, (c) js/m, Narrate, relate. 
J^ Chin', Enter. 

JJI^ P'o', Urge. 

^7^ jilf'i, Delude, astray. 
jiTm, Remote. 
'Er, Near. 



»JM 



Ijfrt -Toan, Go and come, haste. 

-Yiu, Roam, rove. 

Yiln', Revolve, circulate, 
transport. 



^yaj 



i^^ .^Hwan, Return. 

}[ra[ -XieTi, Connect, together, 

4JC|J J liiigr, Meet, welcome. 



198 

i-^t ^Ch*ieti, Remove. 

>*>^ Suvg, To give a present, escort 
7^ away. 

ig Tun', Escape. 
\j^ T'ue, Retire. 



ANALYTICAL RF.ADKR. 



j^\y .U, Leap over, surpass. 



-tim Hiun\ Yielding, modest. 
^^^ 'Ch% End, finish. 
^f Chi\ Footstep. 
^{\ Hiun\ Vivid, energetic. 
j T/T 'S/i', Passing, vanishing, 
j j^^ CM*, Suddenly. 
3 XM -J"iau, Distant, remote. 
1^ Ti\ Transmit, distant. 



-|2^ ji^m. Elect, choose. 

^Tf*' F(x', Meet, welcome, invite. 



-»;^ ^Hwang, Leisure, vacant. 
^r^^ r, Pleasure, escape. 



.^u, Roam, saunter. 

-^^^ Sue, In the rear, far back, 
as a suite of rooms. 

^etig. Meet. 
-^^ ^Pien, Side, border. 



163. ^ 



.t=» 



fart r, City, district. 






-tfUy JI'"^'no> Village, neighbor- 
71-1^ hood, the country. 

i \ ^Pang, Nation, state. 
,7'u, Capital city. 
^ /Jhiau, Suburban fields. 
Ch'io\ Reject, forsooth. 
^ j\W, "na, That, how, where ? 

Pj J ^Iliiln, Name of a place, Zioo. 

-5l*K '<'^'^'^' O^li^l^e, perverse, cor- 
^ -* rupt. 

jSrj^ P^/, Class, sort, bureau, board, 
fl|-* volume. 

-Lin, Neighbor. 

164. "g 



/, Heal. 

iS 'Sing, Awake. 

.(Jh'eu, Reciprocate, friendly 
intercourse. 

*^^ Hin\ Fault, defect, quarrel. 



Kiau\ Leaven, yeast. 
M|;J P'ei\ Unite, fit together. 
"^ 'Niang, Ferment. 
^Han, Intoxicate. 
^Soan, Sour. 



165. 






I 



>S/i*, Loose, release, expound, 
Buddhist. 



VOCABULARY. 



199 



166. 



-JLi, Neighborhood, Chinese 
mile, 18971 Eog. ft. iu 
geography, 1460^ ft., ^\j^ 
of a deg. 

^Ye, Pasture, wilderness. 

Chung', -fli'img, Heavj', dou- 
ble, again. 

J^. -Jjiang, liang\ Measure, capa- 
S. city. 



167. ^ 

^^ fihin, Gold, metal. 
^^^ Si\ Tin, bestow. 

Lu\ Record, inscribe. 
5^h? .^Yin, Silver. 
^|n| -^T'ung, Copper, brass. 
^^ 'T'ie, Iron. 

5fflL ^'^^^^'y Mirror. 

^ Chien\ Inspect, oversee. 

Wn^ Chu\ Cast, found. 

^^g -Ch'ien, Cash, money. 

^J ,Ting, Nail. 

^^ iFeng, Point, edge. 

Ts'o\ Mistake, scattered. 

Tso\ Jtsau, Bore, chisel. 

Cho\ Bracelet. 



ATPt 

Us Jfi^ya•J^; Ring. 

3^m ^^^^'^'^^' Grildiug, brocade. 
^^E ^Siang, Border, inlaid. 
^Bg fihung^ Bell, clock, 
jiu, Furnace. 



A jingling sound. 



^ yCh'iangA 

^^ -JLing, A small bell. 

M^Chung, To love, a measure, 
goblet. 
A/^ fihiiln, Equal, just, vener- 
^^>rj able, a weight of 30 catties. 

168. 

^ Chang, JJh'ang, Long, elder, 
superior. 



Pl^ 



|3lEt 



g^j P'i', Open. 

^ Chien\ In, between. 



169. P5 

jil/eTi, Gate, door. 






-ff'^ct'i, Open. 
;^ P'i*, Shut. 
Shan, Dart. 
^'oS Wide. 

Yue\ Look over, pass over. 
Ko\ Gallery. 






3a 



200 



ANALYTICAL RKADKR. 



njjl -J] ten, Vacant, idle. 

170. ^ 

|^5C G1uang\ .Jiiangy C/orae down, 
I T^ send down, degrade, surren- 
der. 

|>^ 'Fm, Hide, conceal. 

-fih'en. Display, arrange, or- 
der of battle. 



Hien\ Fall into, entrap. 



^ ^^Sue, Follow, at option. 



jji jO, Cringe, flatter, lean on, 
"' ' partial" diminutive, a prefix 

to names. 
p^^Yin, The dark, or female 
principle. 
.Cku, Exclude, besides ; in 
>J> arithmetic, division. 



172. ^ 

'Ya, Refined, literary. 
£ .Nan, Hard, difficult. 
Jji, Leave. 



-iSwe, Though. 

h Tsa\ (c) .pm^ Mixed, promis- 
£ cuous. 

y^^ ^Shwang, Double, a pair. 
/Hlffi .Ti'^U', Carve, adorn, tattoo. 
^ffi ^Chi, Chicken. 

ChHo\ 'ch'iau. Sparrow, bird. 

yYung, Harmony. 



-?7, Corner. 
^ Chi\ Limit, border, junction. 
BH 'Tsu, Obstacle, hinder. 
1^ Lu\ Dry land, by land. 
B-gj Hi\ A quarrel, cranny. 
Uht .Fang, Guard against. 
JW Yuen\ Court, hall, office. 
B^'i^2^(^),A, Append. 
"% *Hien, Steep, perilous. 



173. 

^^ JLing, Spirit, intelligent, ef- 
^1^ fectual. 

'j^ 'if, Rain. 

^^^ .Yiin, Clouds. 



V^ Ch\ Climb, promotion, 
Hie?i\ Limit. 



y=^ Chen\ Quake, convulse. 

^^ ^Hiue, Snow, 

^g, Lii\ Dew, 

^& Jiii, Need, must. 

^Sr -Linq, Scattering, remnant. 

Ji|=* Sian, A halo, fleecy clouds, 
^^ heaven. 

p'^ jITia, Glow of sunset. 
^p ji\7, Rainbow. 



^g .Lue, Thunder. 

^B» ^ShwaJig, Frost. 
^§ -YiV?, Excessive rains. 
^§^ jT7"7z^, Sharp thunder. 



VOCABULARY. 



201 



^a" Tien\ Lightning. 



174. -^ 

"tcl y^^^^^^^ff' Green. 
^^ Ch'mg\ Still, silent. 
•^§^ ^8keng, Fault, crime. 

175. ^ 

3.P ji^g, Not, is not, wrong. 
y^t -Mi) Profuse, not, without. 

176. ^ 

ifrl il/i'e^z', Face. 

177. 

Ko^, Leather, change, dismiss. 
§1 Chu\ Judge, condemn. 
ig yCliiang, Bridle. 

178. ^ 

h|^ } 'iiw', Guard, conceal. 

180. ^ 

^^ , Yin, Voice, sound. 



Hiang, Echo. 



■rtg Fun', Rhyme. 

^7/ -^S/^v.«<, Name of an air and 
Ppl instrument. 

181. W 

^Ilien, Reveal, display. 

^P Ze*, Class, species. 

J'^^^i^ Bow the head, instant- 
ly, at once. 

J|^ Yuen\ Willing, desirous. 
M3 Kti\ Look, regard. 

*ro n Za?', Depend on. 

Ill^ Shun\ Obey, yield, unimped- 

;I|M ed. 

"TP^ t/'^ Beforehand, prepare. 
^|g /Sz^n^f*, Praise. 



XH ,//u, Must. 
7V1 ' 



'^M >^*^' Distribute. 

.^Teu, Head. 

^■g 'i>/??^, Neck. Yin-li7ig, Stretch 
|J^ the neck. 

' Imp, Bear on the head, su- 
perlative. 

-iliaw. Large face. 

,J3a?2, Bald ; with the preced- 
^ ing, stupid. 

^P'o, Somewhat, rather, very. 






ANALYTICAL llEADRR. 



ffH « '^''> TliGDic, subject. 

fih'iiig, 100 mow, au instant. 

-/^*iV^, Incessant, urgent. 
gp Ftv/,*, Color, countenance. 

; Wan, Stupid, perverse. 



182. 



M 



M 



,F(C;?^^, Wind, custom, influ- 
ence. 



184. ^ 

^ 5/i', Eat, food. 
B^r ^-^^''^' Loaf, cake. 
^^ ^ } aw^, Nourish. 
'Tm, Drink. 
j^ -jj. Overplus. 
'Btg ,C/<2, Hunger, dearth. 
^IJL ,CA^', Hunger. 

'B|f| iSA', Ornament. 

,^^ .^Jau, Geuerous in fare, in 
PtQ treatment, forgive. 

^Yung, Breakfast. 

'A* 



^Sun, Supper. 
'f Q 'Pa^^, Full fed, satisfied. 
U\ Sated, filled. 
''Choan, Meats, dressed food. 



/5 



Wm '''^^"' ^'•^"'^^' Jainties. 



^ 



t« 



'AV-, Pastry, bait, allurement. 
Faii\ Boiled rice. 



185. 1^ 



1^ *S/ieu, Head, chief, beginning 

186. ^ 

/^^ ^Hiang, Incense. 

^^ iSing, Fragrance. 



^♦*3 



187. 

i^^ 'i¥a. Horse, 
ffi^ .JAI, An ass. 

jwIm )^'''^'''^' Drive, expel. 
J^ ,Hai, Fright. 

^^^Chiaii, Pride. 

>K ^'"^'' I^eside. 

m%* ^^''^^•> Test, bear a test. 

>gg C7t/a', Equipage, the Empe- 
ror, thou. 

filling, Take fright. 



^^: 



*T1 



»W 



"^ jC/i'e, Ride, rider. 



Ev -To, Camel. 

B^g C/^t-^^', Sudden, gallop. 

firfj '^/^, Sail. 



m 



Chi\ A fine horse. 



VOCABULARY. 

5 Teng, Monut up, run swiftly. 

Jlwa, An elegant horse. 
Knj -Lin, A bay or sorrel. 
|ffi1H iCh%, Run, gallop. 



203 



^m.( 






Gh'eng, Run swiftly. 

188. # 

^T'i, Body, substance, mem- 

ISk bers, sympathy. 

*S* ^Ku (c) -Jiu, Bone. 

189. 

|B| ,ZaM, High. 

190. 

^ Fa\ Hair. 

5^^ -THau, Loose ringlets, young, 
-^f^ youthful. 

il/aM^, Long locks. 

191. n 

T(2M*, Contend. 

nung\ A confused noise. 

192. 

U\ Fragrant, pent, vexed. 

193. ^ 



'3^£. 



m 



194. ^ 

^Kwei, Ghost, devil. 
.3Io, Devil, temptation. 
3^tW -Jlwun, Soul. 

195. J^, 

^ -U, Fish. 

^^& *i/?^, Stupid, name of a kiiig- 
13 dom. 

fflHE ^Sien, Fresh, rare. 
ra^ -Lm, Scales, fish. 

"fflS ^Ktv'en, Leviathan. 

^ - J.?^, A monster said to sus- 
tain the earth. 

Ct Chinq, Whale. 



^ t/S Buy, sell. 

^th >^^^9> Bright, blend, harmo- 
nize. 



m ,AVo', Alligator. 

196. % 

^t .Niau, Bird. 
'pjs ETc', («?) -Jio, Dove, pigeon. 
P^ -J^ing, Cry, sound. 

jMl Feng', Phoenix. 
^^^ -JLoan, Bird of paradise. 
Mb fib', j/'fM^, Stork, crane. 
YIr ^Himg, Wild goose. 

pM ^''^'^^'' ^^agpie, daw, jay. 

197. ^ , 

^,Few, Salt. 



204 



ANALYTICAL READER. 



198. 



fA\ Beantifnl, splendid. 

^^ Jyin, Ki-l'm, an iinimal which 
appears at the birth of a 
sage. 
\lm, A deer with a busliy 
tail, a fly brush. 

Ts'ii, Coarse. |J|, !f|^. 



199. ^ 



^^ Mo\ mai\ Wheat. 



200. 



!|j)C -<^^^«. Hemp. 



tfci? .^J/(7, ^ma, Minute, delicate, 
};Sf\ interrogative. 



-**1 



-«± 



201. ^ 

■"j|§' -Jhvang, Yellow. 

203. M 



Mo\ Silent. 



,^R JTo', ./(i(?, Black. 

^^ ''Tang, Clan, company. 

^S Tae', Dark green. 



205. 



Min\ Strive, urge, a frog. 



Ill 



^dr^ PzV;', (r) ,;??>, A turtle sup- 
MtL posed to hear with its eyes. 

Yuen, Tortoise. 
»» J 

' .T'o, A large iguana. 

206. jfrf 

■rlH '^'^^^' -^ censer. 

207. 

'ivX Drum, excite. 

210. 

^^5^ -(Oh'i, Evenly, united, name 
J=\ of a state. 

*^ f)hai, Studio, penance. 



211. 

■j^J ^Ck\ Upper front teeth. 

jfe^ -Jjing, Front teeth, sign of 
R"P age. 

212. II 

Bg. --Z^i^wgr, Dragon. 

213. 

^ J^wei, Tortoise. 

214. *« 

^H Y<3S Supplicate. 



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